About the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States

The Kissinger Institute on China and the United States is dedicated to promoting greater understanding of issues in the U.S.-China relationship and its impact on both countries and the world. It does so by exploring the political, economic, historical, and cultural factors that underlie the respective behavior patterns and world views of China and the United States.

Inspired by and dedicated to Dr. Henry A. Kissinger’s vision of the importance of the relationship between these two nations, the Kissinger Institute brings together the most expert thinkers and the most promising policymakers and public officials to promote cross-cultural dialogue and enhanced understanding on a variety of issues.

To receive email notifications of KICUS events and announcements, please send your mailing information to china@wilsoncenter.org. More

The Latest from the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States

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The Month in U.S.-China Relations (February) 中美关系月报

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Mar 04, 2015
It should come as no surprise that China prefers to treat individuals, information, and institutions in the international sphere as it treats them within its own borders. China’s fast-emerging competition with the United States in the rule-making arena is an attempt to have Chinese values and standards accepted as legitimate alternatives to established international standards and practices. This month’s newsletter kicks off with three short articles that, read together, present a balanced picture of the competition to make global rules—a competition that increasingly shapes bilateral relations. more

Contested Memories, and Reconciliation Challenges: Japan and the Asia Pacific on the 70th Anniversary of the End of the Second World War

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March 18, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Seventy years after the end of World War II, unfinished postwar reconciliation continue to haunt relations between Asian nations. Japan finds itself at the heart of the regional politics, and its reflections, attitude and remarks toward this part of history still arouse a strong public sentiment particularly in China and Korea. more

The Struggle for Order: Hegemony, Hierarchy and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia

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February 23, 2015 // 2:00pm3:30pm
It is often understood that contemporary politics in the region is marked by balance of power activity that precedes an inevitable power transition when China’s power “catches up” with that of the United States. In The Struggle for Order: Hegemony, Hierarchy and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia, however, Australian National University’s Evelyn Goh argues that U.S. hegemony has been consolidated in East Asia in spite of China’s rise, because of the crucial support of other regional states which prefer a U.S.-led order. more
 China’s president, Xi Jinping, has promoted “political security and ideological security,” opening the door for Maoists. Credit Jason Lee/Reuters

The Month in U.S.-China Relations (January) 中美关系月报

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Feb 05, 2015
The new year in U.S.-China relations began in the uncertain afterglow of President Obama’s and General Secretary Xi’s November summit in Beijing. Those meetings—Xi was said to spend more time with Obama than with all other national leaders combined—were widely read as a joint effort to ease the friction and mutual suspicion that had characterized relations since Xi and Obama met at Sunnylands in 2013. more
Image Credit: REUTERS/Wang Zhao/Pool

China’s Alternative Diplomacy

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Feb 02, 2015
China has just made its biggest foreign policy adjustment since 1989. The bigger question here is, what is the grand strategy behind Xi’s plans? Kissinger Institute Global Fellow, Zheng Wang writes about China's evolving foreign policy under Xi Jinping. more

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