About the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States

The Mission of the Wilson Center’s Kissinger Institute is to Ensure that Informed Engagement Remains the Cornerstone of U.S.-China Relations.

Dr. Henry Kissinger believes that a strong relationship between China and the United States is vital to geopolitical security. Both American and Chinese leaders seek his expertise because his advice is:

  • Informed by study of the history and values that shape Chinese and American policy;
  • Direct in addressing challenges in the relationship; and
  • Balanced in treating both nations in a critical, respectful manner.

A comprehensive approach to U.S.-China policy must be based not only on American interests, but on an understanding of the cultural foundations of Chinese strategy as well. The Kissinger Institute is uniquely positioned to gather and present that perspective by working with Chinese institutions and through the type of policy-relevant research that is the hallmark of the Wilson Center. 

To receive email notifications of KICUS events and announcements, please send your mailing information to china@wilsoncenter.org. More

The Latest from the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States

Russia's National Idea: Matthew Rojansky interviews Dr. Nikolai Zlobin

Article //
Jul 30, 2015
Following the July 23, 2015 event co-sponsored by the Wilson Center's Kennan Institute and Kissinger Institute on China and the U.S., Matthew Rojansky interviews Dr. Nikolai Zlobin on his takeaways from the session. more

China's National Idea: Robert Daly interviews Dr. Ho-fung Hung

Article //
Jul 30, 2015
Following the July 23, 2015 event co-sponsored by the Wilson Center's Kennan Institute and Kissinger Institute on China and the U.S., Robert Daly interviews Dr. Ho-fung Hung on his takeaways from the session. more

The National Idea in Russia and China: Русский Мир? 中国特色?

Event //
July 23, 2015 // 11:00am12:30pm
Challenges in U.S. relations with great powers such as China and Russia derive not only from divergent national interests, but from distinct conceptions of nationhood, sovereignty, and modernity. Americans must therefore consider not only what the United States would like Russia and China to do, but how Chinese and Russians see themselves, one another, and the wider world, including the United States. more
Webcast

Making Food Safe and Sustainable in China

Event //
July 28, 2015 // 2:00pm3:30pm
The leading source of water pollution in China is not industry or municipal waste, rather the country’s vast agricultural sector—pesticide and fertilizer runoff from fields and animal waste from industrial-scale farms. more
Webcast

Cleaner and Greener Chinese Direct Investment in the U.S. Energy Sector

Event //
July 30, 2015 // 9:30am11:30am
Despite China’s slowing domestic economic growth, global foreign direct investment (FDI) by Chinese companies increased 14 percent in the first half of this year. Here in the United States, many of those investments are fueling new U.S. clean energy projects in solar, wind, battery storage, and other emerging clean-tech sectors. When channeled correctly these investments can be a boon for the U.S. energy economy. more

Experts & Staff