6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Reshaping the Investor-State Dispute Settlement System: Journeys for the 21st Century

February 26, 2015 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Wilson Center will host a panel to examine practical suggestions for reform of the current system of resolving international investment treaty disputes.

Georgia’s Foreign Policy Priorities

December 19, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:00am
The Caucasus has experienced its own aftershocks from the Ukrainian crisis, especially in Georgia, which recently witnessed major turnover in the key foreign policy positions. The Georgian government appears increasingly divided as the Georgian Dream coalition faces several major domestic and international challenges. Mr. Zviad Dzidziguri, Deputy Chairman of the Parliament of Georgia, addressed the country’s foreign policy priorities in the region, with NATO, and with the European Union.

Relentless Reformer: Josephine Roche and the Persistence of Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America

January 12, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Josephine Roche, as the second-highest-ranking woman in the New Deal government, generated the conversation that Americans are still having about the federal role in health care. In analyzing Roche’s astonishing life story, which included stints as a vice cop in the 1910s and director of the UMWA’s Welfare and Retirement Fund in the 1960s, Robyn Muncy demonstrates that political commitments born in the earliest twentieth century produced not only the New Deal, as other historians have argued, but also survived to ignite and shape the Great Society.

Bookmen at War: Libraries, Intelligence, and Cultural Policy in World War II

January 26, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The Monuments Men have been justly celebrated for their rescue of art treasures in World War II. The focus on individual heroism, however, obscures the larger impact of the war on modern policies and practices toward information, knowledge, and culture. Kathy Peiss explores the role of librarians, collectors, and intelligence agents to explain why and how books mattered in a time of conflict and devastation.

"Political Insults: How Offenses Escalate Conflict"

December 17, 2014 // 3:30pm — 5:00pm
In her new book, Karina V. Korostelina offers a novel framework for analyzing the ways in which seemingly minor insults between ethnic groups, nations, and other types of groups escalate to disproportionately violent behavior and political conflict. The book shows that insult can take many forms and has the power to destablize and redefine social and power hierarchies. Korostelina uses her model to explore recent conflicts in Russia, Ukraine, and elsewhere, and to explain the complicated dynamics associated with them.

Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz on 2015 Global Policy Outlook

January 07, 2015 // 10:30am — 12:00pm
On Wednesday, January 7, 2015, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will keynote an event at the Wilson Center entitled “2015 U.S. Energy Policy Outlook: Opportunities and Challenges”. An additional panel of experts from academia, government and the private sector will discuss current global challenges and opportunities in energy markets and politics.

Modern Times in North Korea: Scenes from its Founding Years, 1945-1950

December 15, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
North Korea is often portrayed in mainstream media as a backward place, a Stalinist relic without a history worth knowing. But during its founding years (1945-1950), North Korea experienced a radical social revolution when everyday life became the primary site of political struggle, including quite deliberately a feminist agenda. With historical comparisons to revolutions in the early 20th century, Suzy Kim introduces her recent book through rarely seen archival photos, situating the North Korean revolution within the broader history of modernity.

After Crimea - A Brave New World

December 12, 2014 // 10:00am — 11:00am
Dr. Leonid Gozman, long-time democratic activist and president of the Union of Right Forces, analyzed the current Russian crisis. He explained its consequences for domestic and international affairs as well as windows of opportunity that now exist for the Russian opposition, intelligentsia, and the West.

Human Rights Before Carter

December 08, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Underlying much of the writing on United States foreign relations is the conviction that human rights were of limited consequence in policymaking during the 1960s and the early 1970s. Snyder's current research, however, shows that efforts to emphasize human rights began in the 1960s, driven by nonstate and lower-level actors and facilitating the issue’s later prominence due to the development of the networks and tactics critical to greater institutionalization of human rights in these years.

The Changing Direction of Brazil's Economic Policy

December 08, 2014 // 3:30pm — 5:30pm
On Monday, December 8, the Brazil Institute convened a panel of experts to analyze implications and prospects of Rousseff's second term economic strategy.

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