6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

China's Foreign Policy in a New Era of Sino-Latin American Relations

March 24, 2015 // 9:00am — 11:00am
The Wilson Center’s Latin American Program, Kissinger Institute on China and the United States, and China Environment Forum, in collaboration with the Institute of the Americas, are pleased to invite you to a seminar exploring China’s evolving political engagement with Latin America.

Book Talk: "Gulag Town, Company Town Forced Labor and Its Legacy in Vorkuta"

March 25, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
What was the relationship between the Gulag and Soviet society? What was the legacy of Stalin's massive system of forced labor? This talk explored answers to these questions using the case of Vorkuta, one of the Soviet Union's most notorious prison camp complexes.

Islands as Champions of Resilience

March 25, 2015 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
Island communities are often reported in policy documents, academic papers, and the media as being “most vulnerable” to climate change and disasters. But how accurate is that assumption? Join three climate change experts for a discussion on reframing island states from victims of climate change to champions of resilience.

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

March 24, 2015 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.

Book Talk: New Translation "Anna Karenina"

March 23, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:00pm
This talk explored the translation history of Anna Karenina, and the particular role played by Constance Garnett and Louise and Aylmer Maude in establishing Tolstoy’s reputation in the English-speaking world. This led to a discussion of some of the novel’s less well-known, but surprisingly revealing aspects, as seen from the grass-roots level of a contemporary translator, and, through a comparison of the fictional Anna with her real-life British contemporary Louise Jopling, a reconsideration of the novel’s relationship to the “woman question” in late 19th-century Russia.

Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America

April 13, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America, the first systematic analysis of these conflicts among US allies, argues that bureaucratic interests, rather than international mistrust or diplomatic missteps, fueled protracted rivalry among allies. Author Christopher Darnton discusses four critical conflict-resolution initiatives between Argentina and Brazil from 1949 to 1980, based on research in both countries’ foreign ministry archives.

New Alliances for Asia? Prospects for Relations Between Japan, India, and the United States

March 27, 2015 // 3:30pm — 5:00pm
Concerns about making the U.S. rebalance to Asia a reality may be on the rise, but there is no doubt about a rebalance of power dynamics within Asia. As the region’s two largest democracies, Japan and India have numerous mutual interests and concerns amid growing tensions across the Asia-Pacific and beyond.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals: 17 Goals or One?

March 18, 2015 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
The proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), being developed by the world community under the auspices of the UN, provide benchmarks for eradicating poverty, protecting the environment, and empowering people and communities. Join us as speakers from USAID, the World Resources Institute, and George Mason University discuss the current state of the SDGs and the challenges and opportunities for comprehensively pursuing the sustainable development goals.

Mourning Lincoln: Rethinking the Aftermath of the Civil War

March 23, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Public responses to Lincoln’s assassination have been well chronicled, but Martha Hodes is the first to delve into personal and private responses—of African Americans and whites, Yankees and Confederates, soldiers and civilians—investigating the story of the nation’s first presidential assassination on a human scale. Black freedom, the fate of former Confederates, and the future of the nation were at stake for everyone, whether they grieved or rejoiced when they heard the news.

WEBCAST: The Opening Session of the Advancing Climate-Resilient Development Symposium

March 16, 2015 // 9:00am — 4:30pm
Climate Change Resilient Development (CCRD) is a four-year project in support of USAID’s Global Climate Change Office. CCRD activities have taken place throughout Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin America and the Caribbean.

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