6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Modern Times in North Korea: Scenes from its Founding Years, 1945-1950

December 15, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
North Korea is often portrayed in mainstream media as a backward place, a Stalinist relic without a history worth knowing. But during its founding years (1945-1950), North Korea experienced a radical social revolution when everyday life became the primary site of political struggle, including quite deliberately a feminist agenda. With historical comparisons to revolutions in the early 20th century, Suzy Kim introduces her recent book through rarely seen archival photos, situating the North Korean revolution within the broader history of modernity.

Human Rights Before Carter

December 08, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Underlying much of the writing on United States foreign relations is the conviction that human rights were of limited consequence in policymaking during the 1960s and the early 1970s. Snyder's current research, however, shows that efforts to emphasize human rights began in the 1960s, driven by nonstate and lower-level actors and facilitating the issue’s later prominence due to the development of the networks and tactics critical to greater institutionalization of human rights in these years.

Waking from the Dream: the Struggle for Civil Rights in the Shadow of Martin Luther King

December 01, 2014 // 2:28pm — 5:30pm
Exaggerated accounts of urban violence after Martin Luther King’s assassination, David Chappell will argue, have long obscured national reactions of far greater significance. Most important was the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which had been hopelessly stalled in Congress since 1966.

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the Revolutionary World, and the Fate of Empire

November 17, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Britain seemingly should have won the Revolutionary War. Its failure to do so is commonly assumed to be due to the incompetence of commanders and the politicians who are ridiculed in fiction and in movies. Although less crudely presented, such caricatures even permeate scholarly literature. The talk will challenge the stereotypes and offer a very different explanation of why Britain lost the American War of Independence.

Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair, and the Origins of Watergate

November 03, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Forty years after Watergate forced Richard Nixon to resign, Americans still ask why he launched the cover-up that destroyed his presidency. Ken Hughes traces the origins of Watergate back to the final days of the 1968 presidential campaign, when the Nixon campaign sabotaged Vietnam peace talks for political gain, and argues that Nixon’s ultimate loss of the White House was rooted in an obsession with seizing the evidence of the crime by which he gained the presidency in the first place.

FAPESP-U.S. Collaborative Research on the Amazon

October 28, 2014 // 8:30am — 5:30pm
Join the Brazil Institute, FAPESP and the DOE for an all day symposium on collaborative research projects led by scientists in the state of São Paulo, Brazil and in the U.S. targeting the discovery of new science about the Amazon.

Sino-Soviet Relations and the Dilemmas of Socialist Bloc Cooperation: Czechoslovaks in Shanghai, 1956-57

October 27, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
In contrast to traditional approaches to Sino-Soviet relations that focus on ideological conflict and the role of powerful personalities such as Chairman Mao and Nikita Khrushchev, Austin Jersild draws on the experiences of advisers in China in the 1950s to place the Sino-Soviet alliance and split within the broader history of socialist bloc cooperation and the Cold War competition with the United States.

“A Sort of Chautauqua”

October 23, 2014 // 4:00pm — 6:00pm
The Chautauqua is a traveling tent-show that originated in America during the 1800s. These traveling shows featured popular talks intended to edify and entertain, improve the mind and bring culture and enlightenment to the ears and thoughts of the hearer. It is a model that inspires Oleksandr Boichenko, a literary critic, publicist, essayist and translator from Chernivtsi, an emerging center for Ukrainian literature. Boichenko’s Chautauqua at the Wilson Center will feature his writings and views on the impact of recent events, from the Maidan to the tenuous ceasefire, on Ukrainian culture.

World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Book Launch)

October 23, 2014 // 10:00am — 12:00pm
'World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century' seeks to provide the top-level insights and detailed projections that policymakers and researchers need to make decisions supporting sustainable development in the 21st century. This book is the culmination of an international effort of more than 550 population experts, led by researchers at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and the Wittgenstein Centre in Vienna. It provides multi-dimensional projections of age, gender, and education distributions for 195 countries through the year 2100.

The OAS Leadership Transition

October 16, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Honorable Eduardo Stein Barillas will discuss the leadership transition of the Organization of American States.

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