6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book

September 08, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
In The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book, Peter Finn and Petra Couvée bring readers intimately close to the charming, passionate, and complex artist that was Boris Pasternak. First to obtain CIA files providing concrete proof of the agency’s involvement, the authors give us a literary thriller that takes us back to a fascinating period of the Cold War—to a time when literature had the power to stir the world.

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Public Engagement in an Age of Complexity, part of the Science & Technology Innovation Program, is proud to host economist David Colander to discuss the ideas in his new book, Complexity and the Art of Public Policy: Solving Society’s Problems from the Bottom Up.

Turkey, Iraq, and the Kurdistan Regional Government

August 25, 2014 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
The advances of ISIS have reheated the debate on the future of Iraq. The country is threatened by a new wave of violence and destruction, as a large swath of territory has turned into a conflict zone and an uprising has shaken the political order. Turkey has both opportunities and challenges in Iraq, and keeps a close eye on the situation there. In this discussion, experts will address the future of Iraq and the KRG in the context of the current crisis, and will shed light on Turkey’s perspectives on the KRG, energy issues, minorities, and Iraq in general.

"They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide"

August 14, 2014 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–1916 were committed.

Putting the South Caucasus in Perspective

August 05, 2014 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia have been independent states for more than 23 years. Although geographically contiguous, they differ in language, religion, and political and security orientation. How is each country faring in state-building, developing democracy, and improving economic performance? What are their relationships with Russia and the West, and with each other? How does their historical experience influence current developments, and what are their long term prospects?

Preempting Environmental and Human Security Crises in Africa: Science-Based Planning for Climate Variability Threats

August 20, 2014 // 10:00am — 1:00pm
Devastating impacts of climate variability are already being observed in Africa through increased wildfires, shrinking rivers, reduced crop yields, and other forms. These climatic changes are predicted to impact human and state security via increased resource conflict, radicalization, economic crises, and humanitarian disasters. This dialogue aims to more effectively link science-based analysis of climate variability with security planning.

National Security and Climate Change: What Do We Need to Know?

July 29, 2014 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
What do a White House senior adviser, a member of Congress, scientists, military planners, and business people have in common? At a June 4 symposium with 36 leaders from federal agencies, state and local government, research organizations, business, and academia, they all agreed that climate change is having an impact on national security that will only increase with time. This briefing will focus on the key recommendations and consensus points that emerged from the June discussion and highlight the next steps for action.

Freedom of Expression in Mexico: Analyzing the Impact of the Telecom Reform

July 31, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, in collaboration with Freedom House, hosted a discussion of the impact of the Telecom Reform. A panel of leading thinkers discussed the telecommunications reform and its implications for freedom of expression, as well as the ongoing debate about the reform’s secondary legislation.

Migration of Central American Minors: Causes and Solutions

July 24, 2014 // 11:30am — 12:30pm
Foreign Ministers of Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala discuss the regional perspective to the humanitarian crisis and unaccompanied minors.
甲午中日战争 (互动百科图片)

甲午之年话中日

July 31, 2014 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
Please join us for a brown-bag lunch lecture by Dr. Junhua Wu on China-Japan relations, as seen from someone who has deep experience on both sides of the relationship: 甲午之年话中日——来自一个中日边缘人的思考.

Pages