Central Africa Events

Murdering Patrice Lumumba

March 30, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
When Belgium relinquished control of the Belgian Congo in June 1960, a charismatic Patrice Lumumba became prime minister of the new Republic. Stability immediately broke down. The army mutinied, while Katanga Province seceded. Six months later Lumumba was murdered in Katanga; his undisputed rule as Congo’s first democratically elected leader had lasted ten weeks. Over fifty years later, the circumstances and symbolism of Lumumba’s assassination still troubled people around the world. Bruce Kuklick examines this defining event in postcolonial Africa. He reveals a tangled international political history in which many people—black and white, well-meaning and ruthless, African, European, and American—bear responsibility for the untimely death of a national dream.

Call the Midwife: A Conversation About the Rising Global Midwifery Movement

March 23, 2015 // 9:00am4:30pm
Maternal Health Initiative
Speakers from around the world and across the reproductive health community are coming together to discuss the global midwifery movement.
Webcast

Africa's Stalled Fertility Transition: Causes, Cures, and Consequences?

October 15, 2014 // 1:00pm3:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
“Sub-Saharan Africa’s young people are in effect the global labor force of the future,” says Wilson Center Fellow Jack Goldstone. “Whether they are productive, how large that cohort turns out to be, whether they find work or not, is going to have a bearing, I think, on all of us.”
Webcast

Preempting Environmental and Human Security Crises in Africa: Science-Based Planning for Climate Variability Threats

August 20, 2014 // 10:00am1:00pm
Africa Program
Development and poverty reduction are inextricably linked to the water, energy and security nexus in Africa. There was some consensus that the impact of climate variability and extreme climate events depends not only on the severity of the crisis, but also on the vulnerability of the affected population – which is correlated with the level of development along with governance and other socio-cultural factors. Just as poverty can put communities at an increased level of vulnerability, so can sustainable development lead to improvements in climate-resilience and human security.

Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa

July 08, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Africa Program
The challenge of youth employment in Africa may appear daunting, yet Africa's vibrant youth represent an enormous opportunity, particularly now, when populations in much of the world are aging rapidly. Youth not only need jobs, but also create them. Africa's growing labor force can be an asset in the global marketplace.

Religious violence in sub-Saharan Africa and the future of the secular state

June 17, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Africa Program
On Tuesday, June 17th the Africa Program at The Wilson Center held a public event to examine growing religious violence in sub-Saharan Africa and the response from African states, as well as options for US-Africa engagement regarding the current situation with religious conflict. Discussants included Dr. Ludovic Lado, a current Southern Voices Scholar with the Africa Program and Director of the Institute of Human Rights and Dignity at the Center of Research and Action for Peace in Cote d’Ivoire, and Tiffany Lynch, Senior Policy Analyst at the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom. Dr. Monde Muyangwa, Director of the Africa Program at The Wilson Center, moderated the discussion.
Webcast

Why Do People Move? Research on Environmental Migration Coming of Age

May 14, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
When she finished her dissertation on migration as a response to climate change in 2003, it was one of only a handful of scholarly papers published on the topic that year, said Susana Adamo, an associate research scientist at Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network. But in the decade since, interest in climate migration has exploded – in 2012, more than 10 times as many papers were published.

Forests on Film: New Stories from Nepal and the Congo Basin

March 25, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
At the 2014 Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital on March 25, the Wilson Center premiered ECSP’s latest documentary, Scaling the Mountain: Protecting Forests for Families in Nepal. Together with Heart of Iron, a recent film on mining in the Congo Basin, the event took viewers into some of the world’s most remote forests to see how their inhabitants are adapting to rapid changes in the natural resources on which they depend.

New Evidence on the Congo Crisis and Aftermath, 1960-1968

March 04, 2014 // 9:00am12:30pm
Cold War International History Project
CWIHP, in cooperation with the Office of the Historian, US Department of State, will host a symposium on FRUS Volume XXIII, Congo, 1960–1968. The newest volume in the Foreign Relations of the United States series examines US foreign policy toward Congo-Léopoldville during the administrations of Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson.
Webcast

Women as Agents of Change: Traditional Practices and Community-Based Social Change in Ethiopia

June 20, 2013 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Africa Program
Dr. Bogaletch Gebre is the recipient of this year's King Badouin African Development Prize. She is a passionate women’s rights activist from Ethiopia and has been recognized for her efforts to transform the lives of women through innovation and altering traditional conceptions of a woman’s role in shaping her political, economic, and social destiny.

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