Cold War Events

From Free Europe to Free Poland: Free Europe Committee in the Cold War

September 05, 2014 // 9:00amSeptember 06, 2014 // 6:00pm
Cold War International History Project
A symposium and workshop, to be held in Gdansk in September 2014, will assemble senior and junior European and American scholars working on Western policy toward Eastern Europe during the Cold War, individual Free Europe Committee projects, and reactions and countermeasures of the Communist regimes. The Gdansk meeting will aim to catalog and synthesize existing research and stimulate additional collaborative scholarship on the impact of a major Cold War instrument of American soft power.

Ivory Towers and Palace Guards: The Disconnect between Outside Expertise and Policymaking

May 12, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
How does advice and information from outside experts and scholars reach top policymakers—or does it? Terms like “echo chamber” and “information bubble” are often employed to describe an environment where it is difficult for outside information to penetrate or influence the policy process. Author and consultant Suzanne Massie will share the inside story of her interactions with Ronald Reagan and how she provided him with an outside voice at a vital time. Reagan turned to Massie for her advice on understanding and dealing with Russians, and carried her suggestions — including the now famous Russian proverb, “trust but verify” — into his meetings with the new Russian leader, Mikhail Gorbachev.
Webcast

Reagan at Reykjavik: Forty-Eight Hours that Ended the Cold War

May 08, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
In Reagan at Reykjavik: Forty-Eight Hours That Ended the Cold War, former arms control director Ken Adelman, gives readers a dramatic, first-hand account of the Reagan-Gorbachev summit -- the weekend that proved key to ending the Cold War. Based on now-declassified notes of Reagan’s secret bargaining with Gorbachev, and a front-row seat to Reykjavik and other key moments in Reagan’s presidency, Adelman gives an honest portrayal of the man at one of his finest and most challenging moments.
Webcast

Into the Fold or Out in the Cold? NATO Expansion and European Security after the Cold War

May 02, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
Twenty years ago, the 1994 Brussels Summit marked the beginning of NATO’s post-Cold War expansion. It was a process that resonated differently on opposite sides of the former “iron curtain” in the midst of complex and evolving relations between Russia and the West. This year will be no less pivotal for European security as the crisis in Ukraine brings renewed attention to Eastern Europe and the drawdown of NATO forces in Afghanistan continues. Amid these new and ongoing challenges, NATO will hold a summit in September to chart its future course. This panel of distinguished senior officials and experts will reflect on the steps that created Europe’s current security architecture, as well as the advantages and constraints NATO will face in addressing the security challenges of the 21st century.

An Unwanted Visionary: Gorbachev's Unrealized Ambitions and the Soviets' Retreat from Asia

March 31, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Radchenko will offer a fresh interpretation of Mikhail Gorbachev’s foreign policy by showing how the Soviet leader tried to reshape the international order through engagement with China and India, and why his vision for a Soviet-led Asia ultimately failed. Relying on newly declassified records from Russian, Chinese and other archives, he will discuss lost opportunities and recount painful legacies of Soviet retrenchment from Asia.

Foreign Policy by Analogy: U.S. Decision-Making and the Uses of the Vietnam War

March 10, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Over the four decades since U.S. forces came home from Vietnam, Americans have fiercely debated the lessons that the nation should draw from its longest and most controversial war. Mark Atwood Lawrence will suggest a scheme for making sense of how historians, polemicists, politicians, and other commentators have used – and will likely continue to use – the Vietnam analogy in thinking about policy decisions.

The Transformation of American International Power in the 1970s

March 06, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Cold War International History Project
Book Launch: Barbara Zanchetta analyzes the evolution of American-Soviet relations during the 1970s, from the rise of détente during the Nixon administration to the policy's crisis and fall during the final years of the Carter presidency. This study traces lines of continuity among the Nixon, Ford, and Carter administrations and assesses its effects on the ongoing redefinition of America's international role in the post-Vietnam era.

New Evidence on the Congo Crisis and Aftermath, 1960-1968

March 04, 2014 // 9:00am12:30pm
Cold War International History Project
CWIHP, in cooperation with the Office of the Historian, US Department of State, will host a symposium on FRUS Volume XXIII, Congo, 1960–1968. The newest volume in the Foreign Relations of the United States series examines US foreign policy toward Congo-Léopoldville during the administrations of Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson.

'We are the true revolutionaries’: The Democratic Republic of Vietnam in the 1960s

February 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The history of relations between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the Soviet Union and other Socialist states during the Vietnam War is usually told as a story of solidarity and “proletarian internationalism.” But there was another side: while the North Vietnamese celebrated “friendly relations” with Moscow and East Berlin and happily accepted aid provided by the Soviet bloc, they were deeply distrustful of Moscow’s policy of “peaceful co-existence” and the influence of “revisionist culture.”

New Approaches to Trans-Atlantic Relations in the Early Cold War

January 06, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Giuliana Chamedes and Udi Greenberg explore how European agents utilized U.S. institutions and power in order to promote their own political agendas. The panel discussion will shed new light on the ideological and political forces that helped shape U.S. diplomacy in postwar Europe.

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