Cold War Events

Foreign Policy by Analogy: U.S. Decision-Making and the Uses of the Vietnam War

March 10, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Over the four decades since U.S. forces came home from Vietnam, Americans have fiercely debated the lessons that the nation should draw from its longest and most controversial war. Mark Atwood Lawrence will suggest a scheme for making sense of how historians, polemicists, politicians, and other commentators have used – and will likely continue to use – the Vietnam analogy in thinking about policy decisions.

The Transformation of American International Power in the 1970s

March 06, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Cold War International History Project
Book Launch: Barbara Zanchetta analyzes the evolution of American-Soviet relations during the 1970s, from the rise of détente during the Nixon administration to the policy's crisis and fall during the final years of the Carter presidency. This study traces lines of continuity among the Nixon, Ford, and Carter administrations and assesses its effects on the ongoing redefinition of America's international role in the post-Vietnam era.

New Evidence on the Congo Crisis and Aftermath, 1960-1968

March 04, 2014 // 9:00am12:30pm
Cold War International History Project
CWIHP, in cooperation with the Office of the Historian, US Department of State, will host a symposium on FRUS Volume XXIII, Congo, 1960–1968. The newest volume in the Foreign Relations of the United States series examines US foreign policy toward Congo-Léopoldville during the administrations of Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson.

'We are the true revolutionaries’: The Democratic Republic of Vietnam in the 1960s

February 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The history of relations between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the Soviet Union and other Socialist states during the Vietnam War is usually told as a story of solidarity and “proletarian internationalism.” But there was another side: while the North Vietnamese celebrated “friendly relations” with Moscow and East Berlin and happily accepted aid provided by the Soviet bloc, they were deeply distrustful of Moscow’s policy of “peaceful co-existence” and the influence of “revisionist culture.”

New Approaches to Trans-Atlantic Relations in the Early Cold War

January 06, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Giuliana Chamedes and Udi Greenberg explore how European agents utilized U.S. institutions and power in order to promote their own political agendas. The panel discussion will shed new light on the ideological and political forces that helped shape U.S. diplomacy in postwar Europe.
Webcast

Sino-Japanese Relations After the Cold War: Two Tigers Sharing a Mountain

December 12, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
When the Cold War ended, China and Japan faced each other as powers of nearly equal strength for the first time in their long history. Join author Michael Yahuda as he discusses his latest book, along with Japan Scholar Yoshihide Soeya in the latest event in our "Weighing the Rebalance" lecture series.

The Family Jewels Then and Now

October 28, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The famous 1970s investigations of the Central Intelligence Agency conducted by the Church Committee and others followed leaks of information from the intelligence agencies revealing activities that were illegal or abusive under the CIA’s charter. The CIA secretly compiled a document known as “The Family Jewels” detailing the abuses. This season of inquiry resulted in the intelligence oversight system that exists today. Now a fresh set of leaks confronts Americans, revealing widespread eavesdropping by the National Security Agency. What is the proper response to these revelations?

Indonesia and the World, 1965-66

October 21, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Pro-communist coup, military counter-coup, and subsequent mass killings in Indonesia in 1965/66 represent one of the major dramas of the Cold War. The powerful domestic impact of those events continues to haunt Indonesia until today, while the role of foreign actors remains largely hidden. Basing their talk on the first international academic conference held on this subject on Indonesian territory (in 2011), the speakers will introduce their edited book, Indonesia and the World, 1965-66, discuss international complicities, and address the current state of debate.

Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe

October 03, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Martin K. Dimitrov, Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, will speak on the puzzling durability of communist autocracies in Eastern Europe and Asia, the the longest-lasting type of non-democratic regime to emerge after World War I.

Latin America Encounters Nelson Rockefeller: Imagining the Gringo Patrón in 1969

September 30, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In 1969, Nelson Rockefeller embarked on four ill-fated diplomatic tours of Latin America that inspired violent clashes between the state and the street. Contemporary observers and subsequent scholars have dismissed Gov. Rockefeller's goodwill effort as an unmitigated failure. In this talk, Ernesto Capello explores recently released documents, including selections from the thousands of solicitations sent to Rockefeller by ordinary citizens, which demonstrate the need to reevaluate Rockefeller's Presidential Mission as a critical moment in the way Cold War Latin America imagined its neighbors to the north.

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