Democracy Events

Webcast

Arab Uprisings and Mass Politics: Constraints, Change, Uncertainty

March 29, 2013 // 10:00am11:30am
Middle East Program
Laurie Brand discusses her paper on the effect of regional transitions on Arab foreign policy using Egypt and Jordan as case studies.
Photo by Shealah Craighead
Webcast

Russia and the World: A Dynamic Landscape

March 28, 2013 // 8:30am3:30pm
Kennan Institute
This March 28, 2013 conference was organized by the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington in partnership with the Henry M. Jackson Foundation, The Herbert J. Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, and The Kennan Institute. Four panels of academic, industry and government experts examined current developments in Russia’s strategic and economic relationships in honor of Dr. Herbert J. Ellison.
Webcast
Podcast

Democracy in Latin America: Analysis and Policy Implications

March 22, 2013 // 9:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
This event is co-sponsored with the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, University of Notre Dame.
Webcast

Preparing for Election Day in Pakistan: What Constitutes Credibility?

March 14, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Asia Program
Two experts step back from all the talk about surveys, polling, and favorites to discuss broader issues of credibility and institutions, among other topics, in Pakistan's upcoming elections.

1989 After 1989: Memory in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe

March 14, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
The eastern European revolutions of 1989 were a watershed in global history. Despite this, in the two decades since, their meaning has become a source of debate. While they have been promoted as a founding myth for a newly unified Europe, eastern Europeans have repeatedly represented them as a moment of betrayal, martyrdom, liberation, victory, disappointment, loss, colonization, or nostalgia.
Webcast

The Arab Awakening: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead

March 08, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Rami Khouri and Robin Wright assess the past three years of political and economic flux in the Arab world, providing their insights on what they believe will be the challenges to political development moving forward.
Podcast

Media Briefing: Venezuela After Chavez

March 06, 2013 // 11:15am12:00pm
Latin American Program
Wilson Center Latin American Program experts answered media questions about the death of Hugo Chavez and the future of Venezuela and U.S.-Venezuela relations.

Taiwan and the U.S. Pivot to Asia: New Realities in the Region?

February 26, 2013 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Asia Program
As the United States rebalances its diplomatic and military focus toward Asia, some analysts have voiced concern about what a greater U.S. presence in the region might mean for cross-Strait relations. While ties between China and Taiwan have improved in recent years, will the U.S. pivot toward Asia shape the further evolution of cross-Strait relations? Will other Taiwanese interests be impacted by the rebalance? Could Chinese uneasiness about the rebalance work to Taiwan’s detriment? From Washington’s perspective, how does Taiwan fit into the pivot?
Webcast
Podcast

Political Transition in Venezuela: Next Steps and the Implications for U.S. Policy

February 25, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Latin American Program
A discussion of the evolving political situation in Venezuela in light of President Hugo Chávez's prolonged absence from the country.
Webcast

Roundtable Discussion on the Future of U.S. Global Media

February 12, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
In any given week, from North Korea to Iran and across the Middle East, from China to Afghanistan, Pakistan and Myanmar, through Africa and India to Russia, Belarus, Central Asia and Cuba, 165 million people—equivalent to more than half the U.S. population—tune into the radio and television programs of U.S. International Broadcasting (USIB) by satellite, Internet and in some cases cooperating local radio stations. After more than half a century, Congressionally-funded U.S. broadcasting remains the leading edge of American soft power—the principal means by which the United States speaks directly to less free and impoverished nations.

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