Eastern Europe Events

On the Move for Being “Gej” (Gay): Sexuality Rights, Migration, and Democratic Consolidation in Southeast Europe

November 05, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
If you are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender, where in the world do you belong? Today, the growing visibility and activism among those whose gender identity or sexual orientation is outside of the culturally accepted norms in Southeast Europe is coinciding with international and European pressures to protect sexual and gender differences as basic human rights.
Webcast
Podcast

Understanding and Responding to Attacks on Civil Society: The Roles of Politics and Law

August 14, 2012 // 9:30am11:00am
Africa Program
It is crucial for the international community to understand the implications of attacks on civil society for the development of democratic governance in these countries and, more importantly, to identify effective ways to respond to them.
Webcast

Legal Culture and Anti-Corruption Reform: Preliminary Findings of National Survey and Focus Groups Data

June 14, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
As Serbia, Macedonia and Kosovo aim to harmonize their laws with the European Union, little is known about their legal culture and the extent to which European legal transfers are accepted in these countries. Using nationally representative surveys, focus groups, and in-depth interviews in Serbia, Macedonia and Kosovo, this research project maps legal cultures in these countries and investigates the limits of anti-corruption reform.
Webcast

Occupied Economies: An Economic History of Nazi-Occupied Europe, 1939-1945

April 11, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What were the consequences of the German occupation for the economy of occupied Europe?
Webcast
Podcast

Regional Perspectives on the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit

March 21, 2012 // 3:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
On March 26-27, Seoul will host the second Nuclear Security Summit, an initiative established by the Obama administration in Washington in 2010. Fifty world leaders, as well as scores of NGOs and industry and business representatives on the periphery of the central meeting, will discuss the summit’s main aim: to prevent loose nuclear materials from falling into the hands of terrorists. Naturally, different regional actors will have different agendas and priorities for the summit, and it is therefore important to consider the issues and concerns for Northeast Asian, South Asian, Middle Eastern, and former Soviet states and stakeholders.

Trading with the Enemy: How Albanians Armed Macedonia's Revolutionaries in 1903

February 22, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawn from a larger project which examines the relationships between ethnic identity and anti-Ottoman insurgency in early 20th century Macedonia, Keith Brown, an associate professor at Brown University will focus on the specific instance of the Ilinden Uprising of 1903.

The Hungarian "Exception": Lessons in Political Economy

February 01, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Could Hungary's experience as a European Union member state be instructive? During the past decade the country's macroeconomic policies were characterized by sharp changes first under a socialist and later under a center-right government. George Kopits, Wilson Center Senior Scholar and former chair of Hungary's Fiscal Council, will assess the country's fiscal and monetary policies, as well as its overall economic performance and institution-building efforts against the backdrop of the deepening European financial crisis.

British Plans and Attempts at Subversion in Romania, 1939-44

November 22, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Dennis Deletant, Visiting Ion Ratiu Professor of Romanian Studies at Georgetown University and formerly professor of Romanian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College in London charts the operations in Romania between 1939 and 23 August 1944, the date of King Michael’s coup against Antonescu.

Peasants Under Siege: The Collectivization of Romanian Agriculture, 1949-1962—On Creating Communist Authority in Everyday Life

November 16, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Global Europe Program
Gail Kligman, professor of sociology at UCLA and director of UCLA's Center for European and Eurasian Studies will discuss her latest book entitled Peasants Under Siege which explores the collectivization campaign in Romania (1949-1962) and its far-reaching effects.

Lost in Transition: Ethnographies of Everyday Life After Communism

October 20, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Lost in Transition tells of ordinary lives upended by the collapse of communism. Through ethnographic essays and short stories based on her experiences with Eastern Europe between 1989 and 2009, Kristen Ghodsee explains why it is that so many Eastern Europeans are nostalgic for the communist past. Ghodsee uses Bulgaria, the Eastern European nation where she has spent the most time, as a lens for exploring the broader transition from communism to democracy. She locates the growing nostalgia for the communist era in the disastrous, disorienting way that the transition was handled. The privatization process was contested and chaotic. A few well-connected foreigners and a new local class of oligarchs and criminals used the uncertainty of the transition process to take formerly state-owned assets for themselves. Ordinary people inevitably felt that they had been robbed. Many people lost their jobs just as the state social-support system disappeared. Lost in Transition portrays one of the most dramatic upheavals in modern history by describing the ways that it interrupted the rhythms of everyday lives, leaving confusion, frustration, and insecurity in its wake.

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