Eastern Europe Events

Webcast
Podcast

Regional Perspectives on the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit

March 21, 2012 // 3:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
On March 26-27, Seoul will host the second Nuclear Security Summit, an initiative established by the Obama administration in Washington in 2010. Fifty world leaders, as well as scores of NGOs and industry and business representatives on the periphery of the central meeting, will discuss the summit’s main aim: to prevent loose nuclear materials from falling into the hands of terrorists. Naturally, different regional actors will have different agendas and priorities for the summit, and it is therefore important to consider the issues and concerns for Northeast Asian, South Asian, Middle Eastern, and former Soviet states and stakeholders.

Trading with the Enemy: How Albanians Armed Macedonia's Revolutionaries in 1903

February 22, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawn from a larger project which examines the relationships between ethnic identity and anti-Ottoman insurgency in early 20th century Macedonia, Keith Brown, an associate professor at Brown University will focus on the specific instance of the Ilinden Uprising of 1903.

The Hungarian "Exception": Lessons in Political Economy

February 01, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Could Hungary's experience as a European Union member state be instructive? During the past decade the country's macroeconomic policies were characterized by sharp changes first under a socialist and later under a center-right government. George Kopits, Wilson Center Senior Scholar and former chair of Hungary's Fiscal Council, will assess the country's fiscal and monetary policies, as well as its overall economic performance and institution-building efforts against the backdrop of the deepening European financial crisis.

British Plans and Attempts at Subversion in Romania, 1939-44

November 22, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Dennis Deletant, Visiting Ion Ratiu Professor of Romanian Studies at Georgetown University and formerly professor of Romanian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College in London charts the operations in Romania between 1939 and 23 August 1944, the date of King Michael’s coup against Antonescu.

Peasants Under Siege: The Collectivization of Romanian Agriculture, 1949-1962—On Creating Communist Authority in Everyday Life

November 16, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Global Europe Program
Gail Kligman, professor of sociology at UCLA and director of UCLA's Center for European and Eurasian Studies will discuss her latest book entitled Peasants Under Siege which explores the collectivization campaign in Romania (1949-1962) and its far-reaching effects.

Lost in Transition: Ethnographies of Everyday Life After Communism

October 20, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Lost in Transition tells of ordinary lives upended by the collapse of communism. Through ethnographic essays and short stories based on her experiences with Eastern Europe between 1989 and 2009, Kristen Ghodsee explains why it is that so many Eastern Europeans are nostalgic for the communist past. Ghodsee uses Bulgaria, the Eastern European nation where she has spent the most time, as a lens for exploring the broader transition from communism to democracy. She locates the growing nostalgia for the communist era in the disastrous, disorienting way that the transition was handled. The privatization process was contested and chaotic. A few well-connected foreigners and a new local class of oligarchs and criminals used the uncertainty of the transition process to take formerly state-owned assets for themselves. Ordinary people inevitably felt that they had been robbed. Many people lost their jobs just as the state social-support system disappeared. Lost in Transition portrays one of the most dramatic upheavals in modern history by describing the ways that it interrupted the rhythms of everyday lives, leaving confusion, frustration, and insecurity in its wake.

Responding to the Economic Crisis: Austerity, Neoliberalism, and Beyond Neoliberalism

October 06, 2011 // 1:00pm3:00pm
Global Europe Program
Around the world, politicians, activists, scholars, and journalists describe the world as increasingly "neoliberal." For decades, populations worldwide have protested against neoliberal structural adjustment and austerity policies advocated by the IMF and World Bank. The protests in Greece were just a recent case of this worldwide critique. The riots in Britain have also been presented as the result of neoliberal policies. What do these protestors and commentators mean by neoliberalism? Why is it so important? What has caused neoliberalism? Which neoliberal trends do we see around the world? Is neoliberalism coming to an end? This panel will discuss the emergence of neoliberalism and its current state both worldwide and specifically in the former socialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

Theatre and the Holocaust in Romania: A dramatic reading of the Journals of Mihail Sebastian

September 27, 2011 // 4:00pm6:00pm
Global Europe Program
Romania officially condemned its involvement in the European Holocaust following the Elie Wiesel Commission Report of 2004. A first-person account of being Jewish in Bucharest under fascist dictatorship is given by playwright and novelist, Mihail Sebastian, in his diary. Adapted for the stage by David Auburn in 2004, Sebastian comes to life in this one-man show based on his journal. The panel discussion following the performance will be an opportunity for the panelists and audience to discuss anti-Semitism, memory, theatre, repression, creativity and Holocaust remembrance and education in Romania today. This event brings together partners from the Woodrow Wilson Center, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Romanian Embassy to the United States.
Webcast

Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War: A Transnational History of the Helsinki Network

September 13, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
Sarah B. Snyder explores how, in the aftermath of the signing of the Helsinki Final Act, a transnational network of activists committed to human rights in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe made the topic a central element in East-West diplomacy.

Ethnocracy Instead of Democracy in Macedonia

September 12, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
On June 5, 2011, Macedonia held parliamentary elections. The outcome confirmed the fears of many observers, analysts, and democracy advocates that the ruling VMRO-DUI government coalition (both ultra-nationalist parties) will remain in power for the next four years with dire consequences for the future of Macedonia. Over the last four years, the government strongly protected nationalist projects and ethnic alliances, rather than the rule of law. The re-elected government has already shown disrespect for the rule of law, democracy, civil society, human rights, and freedom of speech in its earliest actions, which jeopardizes Macedonia’s attempt to accede to the European Union.

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