Environment Events

The Green Revolution in China

April 30, 2013 // 2:00pm4:00pm
China Environment Forum
Drawing on his chapter in the recently published chinadialogue book China and the Environment: The Green Revolution, Jianqiang Liu relates the role that NGOs, news media and community leaders played in forming an environmental movement opposing a dam on the Tiger Leaping Gorge.

A Briefing on the Niger Delta: Where Things Stand

April 26, 2013 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Africa Program
Contrary to the deadly and deeply troubling situation in northern Nigeria and parts of the Middle Belt, ongoing insecurity, abductions, and politically-motivated violence in the oil-producing Niger Delta, a hotbed of unrest and instability just a few years ago, seems to be abating.
Webcast

Protecting Parks, Empowering People in Mozambique and Zambia

April 17, 2013 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Integrated approaches to conservation and development can both preserve biodiversity and improve the lives of the people who have long depended on these resources. Dale Lewis of Community Markets for Conservation in Zambia and Katherine Raphaelson of the Gorongosa Restoration Project in Mozambique discuss innovative ways they have addressed conservation, park restoration, and improving the well-being of surrounding communities.

IN DENVER, COLORADO - Global Choke Point: Confronting Energy Demand and Water Scarcity in China and the United States

April 11, 2013 // 5:00pm7:00pm
China Environment Forum
China’s soaring economy, fueled by an unyielding appetite for coal, is threatened by the country's steadily diminishing freshwater reserves. The United States faces similar water-energy confrontations—over millions of gallons of water are taken from ranchers to develop the deep oil and gas shale reserves of the west and there are battles between Georgia and Florida over diminishing drinking water reserves. Global Choke Point, though, is not necessarily a narrative of doom and gloom. The presentations will examine both the challenges and opportunities presented by these looming choke points.
Webcast

The United States, China, and Global Governance: A New Agenda for a New Era

April 11, 2013 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
The United States-China relationship is at a critical juncture. Both countries are undergoing tremendous historical changes, and the globe is facing growing challenges in promoting broad-based and sustainable economic development. This report analyzes the tensions and challenges in the relationship and offers policy recommendations about the relationship in the areas of trade, investment, finance, and climate change. Check out the webcast and read the report here!

What Does It Take to Cooperate? New Tools for Transboundary Water Cooperation

April 11, 2013 // 9:00am11:00am
Environmental Change and Security Program
Water is the foundation of human society and will become even more critical as population growth, development, and climate change put pressure on already-shrinking water resources in the years ahead. But will this scarcity fuel conflict between countries with shared waters, as some have predicted, or will it create more impetus for cooperation?
Webcast

Climate Change and Extreme Weather: Impacts on Public Health and Agriculture

April 10, 2013 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Brazil Institute
On April 10, the Wilson Center brings together a panel to discuss how climate change is affecting public health and agriculture.
Webcast

Lessons From Kenya & Malawi on Combining Climate Change, Development, Population Policy

April 08, 2013 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program

The Devouring Dragon: How China’s Rise Threatens Our Natural World

April 04, 2013 // 9:00am10:30am
China Environment Forum
While China’s rise is often viewed through its wide-ranging political and economic effects on the world, its growing impacts on the physical planet will leave a more permanent legacy. In his new book, The Devouring Dragon, Craig Simons argues that China’s growing consumer demands have pushed China from being a small player in global resource consumption to its most voracious participant in just a decade. China’s transition is already having massive impacts on the environment.

Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War

March 27, 2013 // 10:30am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
While there has been much research on the effect of valuable natural resource extraction on a state’s domestic development (e.g., the “resource curse”), Wilson Center Fellow Jeff Colgan focuses on how natural resource extraction affects foreign policy. In 'Petro-Aggression: When Oil Causes War,' Colgan finds that “petrostates” – countries where revenue from oil exports exceeds 10 percent of GDP – are twice as likely to engage in inter-state conflict than non-petrostates.

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