Europe Events

From Sarajevo, 1914 to Southeastern Europe, 2014: Wars, Transitions and Controversies

October 15, 2014 // 11:30am1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on recent scholarship and addressing recent controversies, John Lampe, traces the saga of Southeastern Europe from the explosive mixture of Balkan states and imperial borderlands before the First World War, through the trials that their successors faced during two world wars, the Cold War, and finally the wars of Yugoslavia's dissolution.

Midnight at the Pera Palace: The Birth of Modern Istanbul

September 24, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Global Europe Program
At midnight, December 31, 1925, citizens of the newly proclaimed Turkish Republic celebrated the New Year. For the first time ever, they had agreed to use a nationally unified calendar and clock. Yet in Istanbul—an ancient crossroads and Turkey's largest city—people were looking toward an uncertain future.

Eastern Europe’s Most Difficult Transition: Public Health and Demographic Policy, Two Decades after the Cold War

September 23, 2014 // 9:00am11:00am
Global Europe Program
Dr. Murray Feshbach was one of the first scholars to point out the devastating political and socio-economic effects of state communism’s failure to seriously address decaying public health and environmental conditions. His pioneering work remains relevant. More than two decades after the close of the Cold War, many health and demographic indicators in the former Warsaw-Pact states (including Russia) remain surprisingly inferior to those of the neighboring states of Western and Southern Europe.

Turkey after the Elections: Identity, Democracy and Foreign Policy

September 22, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Global Europe Program
Turkey has had two important elections in 2014 and general elections are expected in June 2015. Prime Minister Davutoğlu has set targets for substantial developments in political, economic and foreign policy realms. In addition, pressing events in the region may force Turkey to take action outside its borders. This panel will address Turkey’s current domestic and foreign policy challenges in this wider context.

The Archive Thief: Zosa Szajkowski and the Salvaging of French Jewish History

September 15, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In the aftermath of the Holocaust, Jewish historian Zosa Szajkowski stole tens of thousands of documents about Jews from French archives and sold them to libraries in the United States. To understand why he did it, Leff takes us into the “backstage” of the archives, and reveals the powerful ideological, economic and scientific forces that made Holocaust-era Jewish scholars care more deeply than ever before about preserving the remnants of their past.
Webcast

Turkey’s Presidential Elections 2014 - What do they mean for Turkey’s democratization process, the Kurdish question and Turkey’s foreign policy?

September 11, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Global Europe Program
Turkey’s Presidential elections in August 2014 offer an opportunity to evaluate the country’s progress under the rule of Mr. Erdogan for the past 12 years and to discuss Turkey’s political, economic and social transformations.

Having Faith in Diplomacy in the 21st Century: Distinguishing Between Noises and Signals

September 10, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Global Europe Program
Dr. Mustafa Cerić, Grand Mufti Emeritus of Bosnia and Herzegovina, will address current global geopolitical challenges, notably schisms in the Middle East and its consequences for the European security project and integration of the Western Balkans into European Union and NATO.
Webcast

World War One: What Were They Thinking? Lessons From the Catastrophe

September 10, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Why did a small number of European statesmen take the world into the seminal catastrophe of the Great War? The German Chancellor Otto Bismarck had warned in 1880 that “some damned foolish thing in the Balkans” might lead to a terrible war. The shots at Sarajevo did just that a hundred years ago. What have we learned?

Scotland on the Eve of the Independence Referendum

September 03, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
On September 18th, Scottish voters will decide whether their country will be the first to secede from a Western-European state in recent history. After two years of campaigning it would seem that politicians, academics, and journalists would have a good understanding of the public sentiment. Using very recent data from the only large-scale, representative, and comprehensive attitudes surveys in Scotland, however, this talk will highlight where the general “wisdom” about Scots’ attitudes towards the referendum may be empirically wrong. The talk will also identify issues that may still move people, in either direction, before casting their vote.

Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe

August 26, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
What should the European Union’s policy priorities be in the coming institutional cycle? How can the economic benefits of the European Union be determined? The Global Europe Program brings together experts from the European Parliament to present one of its most recent studies. ‘Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe, 2014-19,’ illustrates the work-in-progress results of a long-term project to identify and analyze the ‘cost of non-Europe’ in a number of policy fields. This concept is used to quantify the potential efficiency gained in today’s European economy by pursuing a given set of policy initiatives – from a wider and deeper digital single market and an integrated energy market to a genuine common defense policy.

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