European Union Events

Responding to the Economic Crisis: Austerity, Neoliberalism, and Beyond Neoliberalism

October 06, 2011 // 1:00pm3:00pm
Global Europe Program
Around the world, politicians, activists, scholars, and journalists describe the world as increasingly "neoliberal." For decades, populations worldwide have protested against neoliberal structural adjustment and austerity policies advocated by the IMF and World Bank. The protests in Greece were just a recent case of this worldwide critique. The riots in Britain have also been presented as the result of neoliberal policies. What do these protestors and commentators mean by neoliberalism? Why is it so important? What has caused neoliberalism? Which neoliberal trends do we see around the world? Is neoliberalism coming to an end? This panel will discuss the emergence of neoliberalism and its current state both worldwide and specifically in the former socialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

A Luncheon with Her Royal Highness Princess Mathilde of Belgium

June 27, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Council of Women World Leaders
The Council of Women World Leaders was honored to host, in collaboration with the Belgian Embassy, Her Royal Highness Princess Mathilde of Belgium for a private luncheon Monday, June 27, 2011 as a part of the Council’s Spotlight on Leadership Series.

European Energy Policy/ies in Transition - Internal and External Dimensions

June 15, 2011 // 1:00pm2:30pm
Global Europe Program
The tension between unity and diversity is the leitmotif of European politics, and energy policies are no exception. Given the diversity of the continent’s geography and history, it is natural that some nations and regions may support one policy over another, and that a unified policy is difficult to achieve. Marcel Vietor attributed this not only to the attitudes and values that vary from country to country, but also to the fact that different countries have different energy resources and requirements.

Scramble with a New Africa: Comparing Strategies and Policies for the Future of Africa

June 13, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
The relationship of Africa with the rest of the world is undergoing a fascinating transformation. While more than ever, economists point to the potential of Africa's development, the strategic community is often reducing its focus on the rising role of China and other emerging powers in the extraction of natural resources on the African continent.

Forging Central Europe's Energy Independence

May 23, 2011 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Global Europe Program
Anita Orban, Ambassador-at-Large for Energy Security, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Hungary
Webcast

The Left: Does It Have a Future? Global Perspectives

April 25, 2011 // 1:30pm3:30pm
United States Studies
Does the left have a future? This was the question posed by US Studies during its April 25 panel discussion of the prospects for progressive movements around the world.

The Variable Impact of EU Conditionality: Differentiated Reforms in the Entities of Bosnia and Herzegovina

April 20, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Since the Dayton Peace Accord was signed 16 years ago, the European Union (EU) has been actively involved in Bosnia and Herzegovina in various capacities and has created a number of local institutions to support its four current missions. At the same time, the complicated state institutional structure in Bosnia means that the EU must simultaneously interact with a number of local and state-level institutions. Mujo Hadzic discussed a central puzzle: Does EU conditionality work in such a complex environment? Given this institutional complexity, Hadzic argued, both the Bosnian government and the EU struggle to speak with one voice, which dilutes the EU's impact and diffuses the energies of Bosnian institutions.

Stability and Democracy in Albania: Clearing the Path towards European Integration

March 04, 2011 // 12:30pm1:30pm
Global Europe Program
The recent January events in Albania have proved once again that more needs to be done in order to strengthen democracy, democratic institutions and rule of law. As a NATO member country Albania was expected to radiate stability in the still fragile region and to behave as a proper candidate for the EU integration status. However the recent events and the sudden damage these events brought to Albania's image, after years of stability, moderate foreign policy, economic and social developments, have once again put forward the idea that democracy or stability alone can not be a paradigm for a country's or regional development, but only a combination of both well-harmonised by social development and reforms which will make possible a clear separation from the communist past, would guarantee a steady development to the country which until not long ago was considered a regional hub.

Hungary Under FIDESZ: A Retreat from Democracy?

January 25, 2011 // 10:30am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
The economic crisis in Hungary has evolved into a political crisis, as Viktor Orban's FIDESZ government has passed a number of laws and initiatives that severely thwart democracy. Orban's populism has led his government to restrict press freedoms, undermine the balance of powers and silence opponents in the arts and academia by cutting institutional budgets, while claiming austerity. According to Attila Mesterházy, leader of the opposition Hungarian Socialist Party, the FIDESZ government's reforms do not serve the national interest and have harmed Hungary's reputation abroad during this crucial period when it holds the rotating EU presidency.

The EU After the Lisbon Treaty

December 20, 2010 // 11:00am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
Following the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty last year, the European Union (EU) has initiated a series of decision-making and institutional reforms, including the creation of the External Action Service (EAS). Angelos Pangratis, Deputy Head of the European Commission Delegation in Washington, offered an informal progress report on how the EAS will be structured and the key areas of cooperation between the EU and the United States. He argued that the success of the EAS will be judged by its ability to produce concrete results in coordinating and implementing a comprehensive common foreign and security policy for the EU’s 27 members.

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