History Events

Symbolic Nation-Building in Croatia from the Homeland War to EU Membership

August 19, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on a recently published larger volume - Strategies of Symbolic Nation-Building in Southeast Europe – Vjeran Pavlakovic will analyze the nation and state building strategies of the Croatian elite since the country attained independence, following the Homeland War, 1991-1995. In his presentation, Pavlakovic will focus on the role of contested narratives and commemorative practices related to the wars of the 20th century in the political arena. The discussion will also address current attitudes and sentiments in Croatia towards the EU, following the country’s accession to the European Union in July, 2013.

Russia's Far Right and Far Left Friends in Europe

July 11, 2014 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
In recent years Russia has shown a growing interest in East European far-right parties. Now Russia, as Political Capital Institute research demonstrates, is increasingly involving itself with far-right and far-left parties of Western Europe as well. At a time of political and economic crisis some European political forces have become particularly receptive to Russia’s new conservative, increasingly nationalist message. PCI Director Peter Kreko will discuss the changing perception of Russia on the political fringes of European politics and the new challenges it poses for Euro-Atlantic integration at both the national and the EU level.
Podcast

Researching the Middle East

June 10, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Cold War International History Project
This panel will discuss the challenges of researching and writing on recent Middle East history.

FDR, the Jews, and the Holocaust: Resolving the Controversy

May 19, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Nearly seventy-five years after World War II, scholars hotly despite whether FDR was a hero of the Jews or a bystander or worse to the Nazi’s persecution and slaughter of Jews. In this talk Lichtman will draw upon the findings of his prize-winning book, FDR and the Jews (co-authored with Richard Breitman), to resolve the controversy. He will present a new portrait of a consummate politician— compassionate but also pragmatic—struggling with opposing priorities under perilous conditions.

Great Powers, Small Wars: Asymmetric Conflict since 1945

May 13, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
In a sophisticated combination of quantitative research and two in-depth case studies, Larisa Deriglazova surveys armed conflicts post–World War II in which one power is much stronger than the other. She then focuses on the experiences of British decolonization after World War II and the United States in the 2003 Iraq war. Great Powers, Small Wars employs several large databases to identify basic characteristics and variables of wars between enemies of disproportionate power. Case studies examine the economics, domestic politics, and international factors that ultimately shaped military events more than military capacity and strategy.

Covert Legions: U.S. Army Intelligence and the Defense of Europe, 1944-1949

May 05, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
As the Third Reich collapsed, Soviet forces moved deep into Central Europe, and the United States had to adjust rapidly to the new political landscape. The intelligence services of the U.S. Army assumed a key role in informing Washington national security policy toward Europe during this critical period. This presentation discusses the early Cold War operations of U.S. Army intelligence as it sought to apprehend war criminals, suppress Nazi subversion, contain communism, and monitor the Red Army.

Russia in East Asia: History, Migration, and Contemporary Policy

May 05, 2014 // 9:00am11:00am
Kennan Institute
This talk explores Russia’s ties with East Asia through the lens of migration and policy. Russia spans the Eurasian continent, yet its historic and present connections with East Asia are often forgotten. At the turn of the 20th century, thousands of Asian migrants arrived in the Russian Far East, spurring fears of a “yellow peril.” A century later, the recent influx of new Asian migrants to Russia has generated similar sentiments. The talk discusses Asian migration in the context of cross-regional attempts to strengthen trade ties and diplomatic relations in the 21st century.
Webcast

Into the Fold or Out in the Cold? NATO Expansion and European Security after the Cold War

May 02, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
Twenty years ago, the 1994 Brussels Summit marked the beginning of NATO’s post-Cold War expansion. It was a process that resonated differently on opposite sides of the former “iron curtain” in the midst of complex and evolving relations between Russia and the West. This year will be no less pivotal for European security as the crisis in Ukraine brings renewed attention to Eastern Europe and the drawdown of NATO forces in Afghanistan continues. Amid these new and ongoing challenges, NATO will hold a summit in September to chart its future course. This panel of distinguished senior officials and experts will reflect on the steps that created Europe’s current security architecture, as well as the advantages and constraints NATO will face in addressing the security challenges of the 21st century.
flickr/Peretz Partensky

The Political Origins of Economic Reform in Pakistan

May 01, 2014 // 10:30am12:00pm
Asia Program
Pakistan has long struggled to implement reforms and to adapt to an increasingly globalized world. Today, the country's mixed track record in terms of putting in place the right reforms presents one of the leading challenges to stability.

Ethnonationalist Conflict in Postcommunist States

April 29, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Why do ethnonational conflicts reach different degrees of violence? Why does violence continue to reoccur even after strong international intervention for conflict-resolution and democratization? To answer these questions, Maria Koinova combines research on civil wars with the study of non-violent majority-minority disputes by examining 5 degrees of violence in three cases – Bulgaria, Macedonia, and Kosovo – over a 20-year period.

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