History Events

Triumph of Improvisation: Gorbachev's Adaptation, Reagan's Engagement, and the End of the Cold War

April 28, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
James Graham Wilson takes a long view of the end of the Cold War, from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan to Operation Desert Storm. Wilson argues that adaptation, improvisation, and engagement by individuals in positions of power ended the specter of a nuclear holocaust. Eschewing the notion of a coherent grand strategy to end the Cold War, Wilson illuminates how leaders made choices and reacted to events they did not foresee.

America's Great Game: The CIA's Secret Arabists and the Shaping of the Modern Middle East

April 21, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The CIA has an almost diabolical reputation in the Arab world. Yet, in the early years of its existence, the 1940s and 1950s, the Agency was distinctly pro-Arab, lending its support to the leading Arab nationalist of the day, Gamal Nasser, and conducting an anti-Zionist publicity campaign at home in the U.S. Drawing on a wide range of sources, Hugh Wilford uncovers the world of early CIA “Arabism,” its origins, characteristic forms, and eventual demise.

The Two Koreas and the Question of National Reunification, 1953-1960

April 11, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
This panel will explore the positions of the two Korea’s on the question of national reunification after the 1953 Korean War armistice until 1960, when Syngman Rhee was forced from power.

‘Take Your Choice!’: Historical Reflections on the Act of Voting

April 07, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The secret ballot is now considered the gold standard for fair elections around the globe. However, in the aftermath of the American and French Revolutions, voting in secrecy held little immediate mass appeal in the US or Europe, and the secret ballot was used in combination with a wide variety of voting techniques. The history of the fraught introduction of the secret ballot on both sides of the Atlantic provides an opportunity to explore how conceptions of the business of choice-making have changed since the Age of Revolutions and also to reconsider how we vote today.

Overcoming History's Hurdles: Rising Above the Challenges Facing Relations Between Japan, Korea, and China

April 02, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Asia Program
Relations between three of Asia’s biggest economies are at their lowest in decades, as growing nationalistic fervor overwhelms multiple common challenges facing Seoul, Tokyo, and Beijing. Why are the three governments stumbling in history’s hurdles?

A History of the Iraqi Crisis: France, the United States, and Iraq, 1991-2003

March 28, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
Frédéric Bozo will speak on his new book "A History of the Iraqi Crisis: France, the United States, and Iraq, 1991-2003". Based on exclusive French archival sources and numerous interviews with former officials in both countries, Frédéric Bozo retraces the history of the international crisis that culminated in the 2003 Iraqi conflict.

Why We Fight: The Politics of World War II

March 24, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The conventional wisdom suggests that moderates matter little. In her new book, Why We Fight: Congress and the Politics of World War II, Nancy Beck Young proves otherwise. Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman faced a fractious Congress riven by hardcore ideologues, circumstances that empowered moderates—from both parties—to cut deals on economic but not social justice policies. The dominant patterns for postwar politics emerged with liberalism seeming less oriented toward the welfare state and more to the vital center warfare state.

CANCELLED - Waking from the Dream Part 1: Martin Luther King's Last Victory

March 17, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Most Americans have a distorted memory of the decline and fall of the Civil Rights Movement, David Chappell will argue. Press coverage at the time, and retrospective accounts from academia and mass media, blew the riots that followed the King assassination out of proportion.

Foreign Policy by Analogy: U.S. Decision-Making and the Uses of the Vietnam War

March 10, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Over the four decades since U.S. forces came home from Vietnam, Americans have fiercely debated the lessons that the nation should draw from its longest and most controversial war. Mark Atwood Lawrence will suggest a scheme for making sense of how historians, polemicists, politicians, and other commentators have used – and will likely continue to use – the Vietnam analogy in thinking about policy decisions.

Cancelled--Then and Now

March 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
To the inclement weather, this event has been cancelled. Join us for a presentation by former Kennan Institute scholar and Russian novelist, Vladimir Voinovich. Voinovich will discuss his time researching in the United States during the period of perestroika and events in Russia today from his unique perspective. A discussion period will follow his remarks. Attendees are invited to a reception immediately following the event.

Pages