History Events

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the Revolutionary World, and the Fate of Empire

November 17, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Britain seemingly should have won the Revolutionary War. Its failure to do so is commonly assumed to be due to the incompetence of commanders and the politicians who are ridiculed in fiction and in movies. Although less crudely presented, such caricatures even permeate scholarly literature. The talk will challenge the stereotypes and offer a very different explanation of why Britain lost the American War of Independence.

U.S.-Korea Relations in Public Diplomacy

November 17, 2014 // 11:00am5:00pm
Asia Program
Public opinion is playing an ever-increasing role in forging diplomatic ties, including relations between the United States and Korea. Public diplomacy between and within the two countries, and the role the media plays in shaping foreign policy will be assessed in a joint conference with Ewha Womans University and the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

15th Annual Czech and Slovak Freedom Lecture: Slovakia’s Road to Freedom and Democracy

November 14, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Pavol Demes will discuss Slovakia’s road to freedom and democracy

Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair, and the Origins of Watergate

November 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Forty years after Watergate forced Richard Nixon to resign, Americans still ask why he launched the cover-up that destroyed his presidency. Ken Hughes traces the origins of Watergate back to the final days of the 1968 presidential campaign, when the Nixon campaign sabotaged Vietnam peace talks for political gain, and argues that Nixon’s ultimate loss of the White House was rooted in an obsession with seizing the evidence of the crime by which he gained the presidency in the first place.

The AIDS Conspiracy: KGB and Stasi Disinformation

October 28, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
In the second half of the 1980s, the KGB conducted an international disinformation campaign accusing the U.S. of having artificially constructed the virus that causes AIDS at the Pentagon’s laboratory for biological warfare in Fort Detrick, Maryland. On the basis of his research with scholar Christopher Nehring in the archives of the former communist secret police in Bulgaria, Germany, and the Czech Republic, Douglas Selvage will present new details about the disinformation campaign and the key supporting role played by the KGB’s “fraternal organ,” the East German Ministry of State Security or Stasi.
Photo: Wenceslas Square, 17 November, 1989
Webcast

Promoting Free Media: Informing the 1989 Velvet Revolution and the Challenge Today

October 16, 2014 // 2:00pm6:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
Czechs and Slovaks regained their freedom in November 1989 through non-violent protests in Prague, Bratislava, and other towns of then Czechoslovakia. Their Velvet Revolution climaxed a decade of renewed civic challenges to a repressive Communist regime that began with Charter 77 dissidents including Vaclav Havel and accelerated after 1986. Twenty five years after the Velvet Revolution, Europe today is whole and free, but democracy and prerequisite independent media are on the decline in much of the former Soviet Union and elsewhere. RFE/RL, now operating from Prague, VOA, Radio Free Asia, Middle East Broadcasting Network, and Radio Marti, all publicly funded by the U.S. Congress, work to redress the information deficit.

From Sarajevo, 1914 to Southeastern Europe, 2014: Wars, Transitions and Controversies

October 15, 2014 // 11:30am1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on recent scholarship and addressing recent controversies, John Lampe, traces the saga of Southeastern Europe from the explosive mixture of Balkan states and imperial borderlands before the First World War, through the trials that their successors faced during two world wars, the Cold War, and finally the wars of Yugoslavia's dissolution.

Film Screening: "Liberty Train, Next Stop Freedom"

October 10, 2014 // 3:00pm6:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
"Liberty Train, Next Stop Freedom" portrays the dramatic events surrounding the mass occupation of the West German embassy in Prague by East German refugees seeking permission to leave for the West. Negotiations between East and West Germany in late September 1989 led to their release and their travel by special trains from Prague to West Germany via the GDR on a chilly night at the end of September. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with two Germans who grew up and experienced the revolutionary changes of 1989-90 in East Germany.

A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida

October 06, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
N. D. B. Connolly explores the history of real estate development and political power by offering an unprecedented look at the complexities of property ownership during the early and mid-twentieth century.

The Kennan Diaries

October 03, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Kennan Diaries reveals the personal life and the political, philosophical, and spiritual concerns of America’s most noted diplomat and foreign policy strategist, George F. Kennan. Edited by historian Frank Costigliola, The Kennan Diaries is a landmark work of profound intellectual and emotional power.

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