History Events

Book Talk: New Translation "Anna Karenina"

March 23, 2015 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Kennan Institute
This talk explored the translation history of Anna Karenina, and the particular role played by Constance Garnett and Louise and Aylmer Maude in establishing Tolstoy’s reputation in the English-speaking world. This led to a discussion of some of the novel’s less well-known, but surprisingly revealing aspects, as seen from the grass-roots level of a contemporary translator, and, through a comparison of the fictional Anna with her real-life British contemporary Louise Jopling, a reconsideration of the novel’s relationship to the “woman question” in late 19th-century Russia.

Contested Memories and Reconciliation Challenges: Japan and the Asia Pacific on the 70th Anniversary of the End of the Second World War

March 18, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Asia Program
Seventy years after the end of World War II, unfinished postwar reconciliation continue to haunt relations between Asian nations. Japan finds itself at the heart of the regional politics, and its reflections, attitude and remarks toward this part of history still arouse a strong public sentiment particularly in China and Korea. Read the summary and policy recommendations here!

"Empire" and "Invitations": Geir Lundestad’s Impact on Cold War Scholarship in Perspective

March 13, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
Geir Lundestad has been the Director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo and Secretary of the Norwegian Nobel Committee since 1990, retiring at the end of 2014 as director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute. Geir has made an enormous scholarly contribution to the field of history and supported many scholarly endeavors in the social sciences through the Nobel Institute fellowship and symposia program inaugurated under his leadership. Please join us for a symposium honoring Professor Geir Lundestad at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

The Danger of the Single Story: African Americans' Anticolonialism in the Early Cold War

March 09, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
After the onset of the Cold War, fierce anticolonialism emanated solely out of the black left, which paid dearly for opposing U.S. imperial policy. Meanwhile African American liberals, such as the NAACP, turned their backs on Asians and Africans determined to be free, colluded with the Truman administration’s support of European empires, and received, in return a few pieces of civil rights tokens. Carol Anderson will speak about her latest book, "Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960."

To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party

March 02, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
How did the Republican Party—the progressive party of Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Dwight D. Eisenhower—become the reactionary party of today? Over the one hundred and sixty years of their history, Republicans have swung repeatedly from championing the middle class to protecting the rich. Their story reveals the tensions inherent in America’s peculiar brand of government: how can a democracy promote individual economic opportunity at the same time it protects property?

Anonymous Soldiers: The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947

February 26, 2015 // 12:00pm1:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
Bruce Hoffman speaks about his latest book, Anonymous Soldier: The Stuggle for Israel, 1917-1947, which examines the critical period in the establishment of Israel, chronicling three decades of growing anticolonial unrest that culminated in the end of British rule and the UN resolution to create two separate states.

“Legacy of Soviet Dissent for Russia's Post-Soviet Generations”

February 24, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Many young Russians, whether politically active or indifferent, know little about the dissidents of the Soviet era. They don’t understand what motivated people of the time to speak out, why some dissidents decided to leave the country, or what was the significance of samizdat, the “self-published” writings and poetry that people passed around in secret at the time. The Voice of America launched a documentary series in 2013 featuring interviews, documents, and narration to tell the stories from this part of Russian history.

The Strategist: Brent Scowcroft and the Call of National Security

February 23, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
For four decades Brent Scowcroft has exerted a quiet, continued, and sometimes great influence over the conduct of US national security policy. Drawing on his new biography, The Strategist: Brent Scowcroft and the Call of National Security, Bartholomew Sparrow discusses how Scowcroft rose to become national security advisor under presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush.

Colonel House: A Biography of Woodrow Wilson's Silent Partner

February 09, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In this seminar biography, Charles E. Neu details the life of "Colonel" House, a Texas landowner who rose to become one of the century's greatest political operators. In 191l House met Woodrow Wilson, and almost immediately the two formed one of the most famous friendships in American political history.

Greece and EEC Membership: Was it a Mistake?

February 03, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Greece, the EEC and the Cold War, 1974-1979 by Eirini Karamouzi explores the history of the European Economic Community (EEC) in the turbulent decade of the 1970s with a focus on the Community’s response to the fall of the Greek dictatorship and the country’s application for EEC membership.

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