History Events

OFF-SITE CONFERENCE: United Atoms in a Divided World: The Early History of the International Atomic Energy Agency

September 16, 2012 // 7:30pmSeptember 18, 2012 // 3:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
The Department of Contemporary History at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Wilson Center's Nuclear Proliferation International History Project will host an international conference on the history of the IAEA during the cold war years. The conference will cover a wide range of issues, including the creation of the Agency, its role in the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and the Agency's technical programs. Beyond that, the conference seeks to discuss the cultural, societal, and economic context of the IAEA's early history.

The 1967 War and the Demise of Arab Nationalism

September 10, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The defeat of Egypt and Syria in the 1967 is often described as a deathblow to pan-Arabism, and it did indeed gravely undermine the regime of Gamal Abdel Nasser. Egyptians, Syrians and Palestinians had in fact already begun to shift towards narrower nation-state nationalism even before the 1967 war, which merely confirmed this reorientation.
Webcast

Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam

September 05, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History.
Podcast

The Spirit of Cities: Why the Identity of a City Matters in a Global Age

July 25, 2012 // 9:00am10:30am
Urban Sustainability Laboratory
Cities define us. They shape the outlooks, opportunities and lives of over half of the world’s population. Yet most contemporary political thought neglects their role. The Ancient Greeks, by contrast, thought that every city had its own ethos and values that helped to determine its institutions, political systems and the lives of its citizens. Daniel Bell thinks it is time to revive the thinking of the Greeks and rediscover the spirit of cities.

OFFSITE - The Rise of a Multipolar World: Sino-European Relations in the Last Decades of the Cold War (1960s-1980s)

June 29, 2012 // 9:00amJuly 01, 2012 // 5:15pm
Cold War International History Project
Bringing together academics, diplomats, and newly declassified documentation, the conference will seek to determine how the Sino-Soviet split and the subsequent Sino-American engagement influenced Sino-European relations in the Cold War.
Webcast
Podcast

North Korean Calculations behind the Blue House Raid and the USS Pueblo Incident

June 20, 2012 // 2:00pm3:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
On June 20, Korea Foundation Junior Scholar Yuree Kim will present the results of her research conducted at the Woodrow Wilson Center from January through June 2012.
Webcast
Podcast

The Failure of Democracy in Post-Soviet Eurasia

June 12, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Twenty years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, it is clear that democracy has failed to take root in most former Soviet republics. Based on extensive field research in the region, Kennan Institute Title VIII-Supported Research Scholars Jody LaPorte and Danielle Lussier will discuss the varieties of non-democratic regimes that have developed and will offer some explanations for the failure of democracy in Russia, Central Asia, and the Caucasus.
Webcast
Podcast

Familiar Strangers in the Soviet Marketplace: Georgian Trade Networks between the Caucasus and Moscow

June 11, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
“Why were Georgian trade networks so successful?” asked Erik R. Scott, Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute, at an 11 June 2012 lecture. Georgian businessmen and their trade networks and products occupied a unique position in the informal economy in the Soviet Union and supplied many of the scarce and exotic goods Soviet consumers desired. Georgian trade networks exploited the mobility made possible by the porous internal borders of the Soviet Union. Scott characterized the Soviet Union as an “empire of diaspora” comprised of mobile ethnicities who could move and trade throughout the Union.

Between Scylla and Charybdis: US Cold War Strategy and the Question of Democracy in South Korea, 1961-1972

June 05, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
On June 5, Wilson Center History and Public Policy Scholar Sang-Yoon Ma will present on "Between Scylla and Charybdis: US Cold War Strategy and the Question of Democracy in South Korea, 1961-1972"

Belarusian State Formation: Examining 1919-1939 Contestation in Poland's West Belarus

June 04, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
As modern Belarus seems to be caught in limbo between the West (EU\NATO) on one side, and Russia with her post-imperial ambitions on the other, it is still undecided where it really belongs. Some observers claim that the modern Belarusian state is Soviet by its origin and design, but there were also suppressed historical alternatives to it in the recent 20th century Belarusian past. Aliaksandr Paharely, Visiting Scholar, Center for Belarusian Studies, Southwestern College, Kansas, will address the putative evolutionary and revolutionary scenarios of social change and nation and states building that were debated in Poland’s West Belarus during the interwar years.

Pages

EMAIL UPDATES