History Events

Cancelled--Then and Now

March 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
To the inclement weather, this event has been cancelled. Join us for a presentation by former Kennan Institute scholar and Russian novelist, Vladimir Voinovich. Voinovich will discuss his time researching in the United States during the period of perestroika and events in Russia today from his unique perspective. A discussion period will follow his remarks. Attendees are invited to a reception immediately following the event.

North Korea after Jang Sung Taek and the Outlook for Inter-Korean Relations

February 28, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
The purge and execution of Jang Sung Taek was caused by the combination of a struggle over economic interests and political power as well as shortcomings of the Military-first System. While it is too early to determine what the consequences of Jang’s execution are in terms of the political stability and future policy directions of the Kim Jong Un regime, this panel will explore some possibilities, particularly in terms of inter-Korean relations.
Podcast

Cyprus - Prospects and Challenges: Looking Ahead to 2014

February 28, 2014 // 12:30pm1:30pm
Global Europe Program
It has been forty years since hostilities divided the Republic of Cyprus, yet the discovery of hydrocarbon reserves in the Eastern Mediterranean indicate that 2014 could be a year of possibility for the island nation. The potential development of these hydrocarbon resources could provide an opportunity for Cyprus to become a major regional player.

Australia's Historic Minimum Wage: A World History Approach

February 24, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Histories of the minimum wage are usually written within national analytic frameworks. Research in the New York Public Library on the first minimum wage, legislated in Victoria, Australia, in 1896, convinced historian Marilyn Lake that a world history approach was necessary, one that located this experiment in “state socialism” in the context of both the longue duree of imperial labor relations and encounters between the subjects of the British and Chinese empires in the new world of urban Melbourne.

Racing Against Time: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America's Fight Over Saving Britain and Going to War

February 10, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Today, we think of World War II as the "good war" – a necessary conflict to save Western civilization from the evil of Nazi Germany. But in the years leading up to Pearl Harbor, millions of Americans were swept up in a passionate, bitterly fought debate over what America's role should be in the war. At stake was the very shape and future of America.
Webcast

Iran's Tumultuous Revolution: 35 Years Later

February 10, 2014 // 11:00am12:30pm
Middle East Program
The Middle East Program of the Woodrow Wilson Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace present "Iran's Tumultuous Revolution: 35 Years Later"

'We are the true revolutionaries’: The Democratic Republic of Vietnam in the 1960s

February 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The history of relations between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the Soviet Union and other Socialist states during the Vietnam War is usually told as a story of solidarity and “proletarian internationalism.” But there was another side: while the North Vietnamese celebrated “friendly relations” with Moscow and East Berlin and happily accepted aid provided by the Soviet bloc, they were deeply distrustful of Moscow’s policy of “peaceful co-existence” and the influence of “revisionist culture.”

The Past and Future of the Foreign Relations Series

January 27, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In more than 450 volumes produced since its inception in 1861, the U.S. Department of State’s Foreign Relations of the United States series presents the official documentary historical record of major U.S. foreign policy decisions and significant diplomatic activity. State Department Historian Stephen P. Randolph will discuss the series’ past as well as the many challenges facing it today, not least technological developments that threaten the future of the bound volumes familiar to generations of diplomats and historians.

Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane

January 14, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Lost Enlightenment recounts how, between the years 800 and 1200, Central Asia led the world in trade and economic development, the size and sophistication of its cities, the refinement of its arts, and, above all, in the advancement of knowledge in many fields. Lost Enlightenment chronicles this forgotten age of achievement, seeks to explain its rise, and explores the competing theories about the cause of its eventual demise. Informed by the latest scholarship yet written in a lively and accessible style, this is a book that will surprise general readers and specialists alike.

People Out of Place: A Constitutional History of the Long 1960s

January 13, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Vagrancy laws made it a crime to be idle and poor, or dissolute, or to wander about without any purpose. African Americans and other civil rights activists, communists, labor union activists, poor people, Beats and hippies, gay men and lesbians, women, Vietnam War protestors and student activists, and young, urban minority men all contested their constitutionality. In 1971 and 1972, the Supreme Court struck them down. Risa Goluboff shows how this changing constitutional status of vagrancy laws was part and parcel of the larger social transformations of the long 1960s.

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