History Events

The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book

September 08, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book, Peter Finn and Petra Couvée bring readers intimately close to the charming, passionate, and complex artist that was Boris Pasternak. First to obtain CIA files providing concrete proof of the agency’s involvement, the authors give us a literary thriller that takes us back to a fascinating period of the Cold War—to a time when literature had the power to stir the world.

North Korean War Orphans in Transnational Educational Exchange

August 27, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
More than 100,000 children from both North and South Korea were orphaned during the Korean War. In 1953, the North Korean government dispatched 1,200 orphans to the People’s Republic of Poland to be educated at a boarding school transformed into an orphanage. The orphans were repatriated after six years, at the insistence of the North Korean government, as tensions between Pyongyang and its communist allies began to emerge. NKIDP Intern Intaek Hong examines the complicated process of how the orphans defined their identity based on their experience of interacting with their Polish teachers—who became like foster parents—and deploying their subjectivity in the process.

Symbolic Nation-Building in Croatia from the Homeland War to EU Membership

August 19, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on a recently published larger volume - Strategies of Symbolic Nation-Building in Southeast Europe – Vjeran Pavlakovic will analyze the nation and state building strategies of the Croatian elite since the country attained independence, following the Homeland War, 1991-1995. In his presentation, Pavlakovic will focus on the role of contested narratives and commemorative practices related to the wars of the 20th century in the political arena. The discussion will also address current attitudes and sentiments in Croatia towards the EU, following the country’s accession to the European Union in July, 2013.

"They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide"

August 14, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Kennan Institute
Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–1916 were committed.

Russia's Far Right and Far Left Friends in Europe

July 11, 2014 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
In recent years Russia has shown a growing interest in East European far-right parties. Now Russia, as Political Capital Institute research demonstrates, is increasingly involving itself with far-right and far-left parties of Western Europe as well. At a time of political and economic crisis some European political forces have become particularly receptive to Russia’s new conservative, increasingly nationalist message. PCI Director Peter Kreko will discuss the changing perception of Russia on the political fringes of European politics and the new challenges it poses for Euro-Atlantic integration at both the national and the EU level.
Podcast

Researching the Middle East

June 10, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Cold War International History Project
This panel will discuss the challenges of researching and writing on recent Middle East history.

FDR, the Jews, and the Holocaust: Resolving the Controversy

May 19, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Nearly seventy-five years after World War II, scholars hotly despite whether FDR was a hero of the Jews or a bystander or worse to the Nazi’s persecution and slaughter of Jews. In this talk Lichtman will draw upon the findings of his prize-winning book, FDR and the Jews (co-authored with Richard Breitman), to resolve the controversy. He will present a new portrait of a consummate politician— compassionate but also pragmatic—struggling with opposing priorities under perilous conditions.

Great Powers, Small Wars: Asymmetric Conflict since 1945

May 13, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
In a sophisticated combination of quantitative research and two in-depth case studies, Larisa Deriglazova surveys armed conflicts post–World War II in which one power is much stronger than the other. She then focuses on the experiences of British decolonization after World War II and the United States in the 2003 Iraq war. Great Powers, Small Wars employs several large databases to identify basic characteristics and variables of wars between enemies of disproportionate power. Case studies examine the economics, domestic politics, and international factors that ultimately shaped military events more than military capacity and strategy.

Covert Legions: U.S. Army Intelligence and the Defense of Europe, 1944-1949

May 05, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
As the Third Reich collapsed, Soviet forces moved deep into Central Europe, and the United States had to adjust rapidly to the new political landscape. The intelligence services of the U.S. Army assumed a key role in informing Washington national security policy toward Europe during this critical period. This presentation discusses the early Cold War operations of U.S. Army intelligence as it sought to apprehend war criminals, suppress Nazi subversion, contain communism, and monitor the Red Army.

Russia in East Asia: History, Migration, and Contemporary Policy

May 05, 2014 // 9:00am11:00am
Kennan Institute
This talk explores Russia’s ties with East Asia through the lens of migration and policy. Russia spans the Eurasian continent, yet its historic and present connections with East Asia are often forgotten. At the turn of the 20th century, thousands of Asian migrants arrived in the Russian Far East, spurring fears of a “yellow peril.” A century later, the recent influx of new Asian migrants to Russia has generated similar sentiments. The talk discusses Asian migration in the context of cross-regional attempts to strengthen trade ties and diplomatic relations in the 21st century.

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