History Events

Webcast

Civil Military Relations: At the Heart of Military History

April 11, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Military historians of the modern era have often neglected the relationship between the armed forces and the state, particularly its effect on outcomes in war and military policy and activity during peacetime. Yet some of the more famous writing on military theory have emphasized the importance of the topic. Military historians of the United States, as the literature reveals, have only now begun to address the subject systematically and in depth.
Webcast

Reluctant Accomplice: "Good Germans" in the War of Annihilation, 1939-1942

April 07, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Konrad H. Jarausch, Lurcy Professor of European Civilization, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill will discuss his latest book entitled Reluctant Accomplice: "Good Germans" in the War of Annihilation, 1939-1942. Comprised of wartime letters written by Jarausch's father, Konrad Jarausch, a German high-school teacher of religion and history who served in a reserve battalion of Hitler's army in Poland and Russia. The book brings the letters together to tell the gripping story of a patriotic soldier of the Third Reich who, through witnessing its atrocities in the East, begins to doubt the war's moral legitimacy.
Webcast

American Biography After the Cold War

April 04, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What are the issues of judgment, perspective, and stance that confront historians whose subjects played a role in debates about Stalinism, McCarthyism, and Communism? In the years when the Cold War shaped perceptions, historians identified themselves with particular political positions. But what is the view toward such issues today? Is the intellectual Cold War over? Or does it still constrain our minds and our words? Lillian Hellman will serve as a case in point in this presentation with Columbia University R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History Alice Kessler-Harris.

"A Hard Country to Love": Patriotism and National Identity in Russia's Great War, 1914-1918

April 04, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Melissa Stockdale, Associate Professor of History, University of Oklahoma, and Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center, discussed how Imperial Russia's participation in World War I led to a mobilization campaign that united the country's population under a cultivated national identity.
Webcast

Kissinger's Realpolitik and American Exceptionalism

March 28, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Henry Kissinger is perhaps the most famous and most controversial American diplomat of the twentieth century. Much of the literature about him emphasizes his geopolitical approach to international relations, his European background, and his advocacy of Realpolitik. But to a large extent of his foreign policy was fundamentally shaped and conditioned by domestic politics. Kissinger ultimately failed to bring about a different approach to foreign policy, one moving beyond American exceptionalism and toward an understanding of the limits of power.
Webcast

Ruth Fischer: A Life For and Against Communism, 1895-1961

March 24, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Mario Kessler, associate professor at the University of Potsdam, Germany will discuss Ruth Fischer's political itinerary and attempt to explain why it went to such extremes – astonishing even in the ‘Age of Extremes.'
Webcast

The Russian Imperial Legacy—Stalin and the Outbreak of the War in the East: Barbarossa

March 21, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Few events in the history of the twentieth century are as controversial, politicized, and laden with emotion as is the launching of operation Barbarossa—the German Invasion of Russia. It has become a fertile ground for conspiracy theories and a subject of unending polemics. This presentation will discuss a vital but missing dimension: the subjugation of ideological premises to the everlasting Russian imperial legacy as the driving force behind Stalin's policies on the eve of operation Barbarossa.
Lorenzo Vidino
Webcast

Book Discussion: The New Muslim Brotherhood in the West

March 17, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
A discussion with author Lorenzo Vidino, visiting fellow at RAND Corporation
Webcast

The 'Good Occupation': Military Government in the American Imagination

March 14, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Military occupation has been a crucial dimension of U.S. foreign relations from the early nineteenth century to the present. The occupations of Germany and Japan in the wake of the Second World War generally were regarded positively. The occupation of Iraq, which initially met with some approbation, eventually tarnished the reputation of the George W. Bush administration. Wilson Center fellow Susan L. Carruthers will explain the transformation of public attitude.
Webcast

Rethinking the History of the French Welfare State

March 07, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
This seminar will delineate the French welfare state in long-term historical perspective and consider the multiple strands of tradition, institutions, and policies that contributed to its founding and development. It will link practices to successive political regimes and make comparisons between French and British welfare systems. What are the possible future directions of French welfare policy in view of past precedents and current conditions?

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