History Events

Revolutionary Mosquitoes: Malaria, Yellow Fever, and Independence in the Americas, 1776-1825

October 07, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
John McNeill argues that yellow fever and malaria, both mosquito-borne diseases, helped make the Americas free. In the campaigns of 1780-81 in the Carolinas and Virginia, in the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804, in the wars of independence in the Spanish Americas of 1808-25, locally born and raised soldiers and militia enjoyed a strong advantage over European troops in terms of their resistance to these two infections. Did disease tip the military balance?

Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe

October 03, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Martin K. Dimitrov, Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, will speak on the puzzling durability of communist autocracies in Eastern Europe and Asia, the the longest-lasting type of non-democratic regime to emerge after World War I.

Leadership in the Asia-Pacific: The Road Ahead for Japan and the United States HELD IN TOKYO

October 02, 2013 // 10:00am5:30pm
Asia Program
Economic growth and stability in the Asia-Pacific is hardly a regional issue. The world at large has a major stake in ensuring peace and prosperity in the region, especially amid growing risks worldwide. In the fifth annual Japan-U.S. Joint Public Policy Forum to be held October 2 in Tokyo hosted by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation and the Wilson Center, experts from both countries will gather to discuss the outlook and challenges ahead for Japan and the United States to take leadership in the Asia-Pacific region.

Strategy: A History

October 01, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In Strategy: A History, Sir Lawrence Freedman, one of the world's leading authorities on war and international politics, captures the vast history of strategic thinking, in a consistently engaging and insightful account of how strategy came to pervade every aspect of our lives.

Latin America Encounters Nelson Rockefeller: Imagining the Gringo Patrón in 1969

September 30, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In 1969, Nelson Rockefeller embarked on four ill-fated diplomatic tours of Latin America that inspired violent clashes between the state and the street. Contemporary observers and subsequent scholars have dismissed Gov. Rockefeller's goodwill effort as an unmitigated failure. In this talk, Ernesto Capello explores recently released documents, including selections from the thousands of solicitations sent to Rockefeller by ordinary citizens, which demonstrate the need to reevaluate Rockefeller's Presidential Mission as a critical moment in the way Cold War Latin America imagined its neighbors to the north.

The Accidental Victim: JFK, Lee Harvey Oswald, and the Real Target in Dallas

September 26, 2013 // 12:00pm1:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Wilson Center Senior Scholar James Reston, Jr. discusses his new book on the Kennedy assassination.

Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, 1954-1965

September 25, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Please join us for a book launch for Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, in which Pierre Asselin explores the communist path to war by way of new and largely inaccessible Vietnamese materials as well as French, British, Canadian, and American documents.

Reshaping Eurasia's Future: Russia, China, and the EU

September 25, 2013 // 9:00am2:00pm
Global Europe Program
Eurasian geopolitics are more fluid now than they have been for at least a decade. The looming U.S. withdrawal of combat troops from Afghanistan and Russia's uncertain capabilities in the region leave a vacuum for new extra-regional powers to fill.
Podcast

The Worlds of Joseph Conrad

September 23, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What does it feel like to live in a world transformed by new technology, new ideas, and new dynamics of world power? A century ago, the author Joseph Conrad provided vivid answers to questions we still ask today. In his novels Heart of Darkness (1899), Lord Jim (1900), Nostromo (1904), and The Secret Agent (1907) – each set on a different continent, each anchored in historical incidents and in personal experience – Conrad revealed the forces challenging European dominance, and anticipated the defining currents of the twentieth century.

Brothers at War: The Unending Conflict in Korea

September 23, 2013 // 9:30am11:00am
North Korea International Documentation Project
Please join NKIDP for a book launch with Sheila Miyoshi Jager for Brothers at War: The Unending Conflict in Korea, a major historical account of the Korean War, its origins, and its evolving impact on the world.

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