History Events

The Myth of Race and Its Many Political Uses, from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America

December 09, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In this presentation, Jacqueline Jones will focus upon the different uses of the myth of race in specific times and places. The life-stories of a Maryland slave murdered by his master; a fugitive in Revolutionary South Carolina; a savvy businesswoman in antebellum Providence; a principled Republican in post-Civil War Savannah; a school principal in segregationist Mississippi; and a Marxist autoworker in industrial Detroit all suggest the shifting, contradictory nature of racial mythologies from the seventeenth century to the present.
Webcast
Podcast

Political Dispossession of Roma in Contemporary Europe

December 05, 2013 // 2:00pm6:00pm
Global Europe Program
The Global Europe Program is pleased to host the 9th Annual Ion Ratiu Democracy Award Workshop - "Democracy, Human Rights, Entrenched Poverty: Political Dispossession of Roma in Contemporary Europe," featuring Dr. Angela Kocze, leading Hungarian Roma rights activist and a visiting assistant professor at Wake Forest University, NC.

Yellow and Gold: Chinese Gold Miners and the ‘Chinese Question’ in Pacific-World Settler Colonies, 1848-1910

December 02, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Mae Ngai will address two transpacific circulations in the late-19th century — the movement of Chinese to the gold rushes of the Pacific world, including the forms of work and social organization that they brought with them from southern China and southeast Asia and their local adaptions; and the circulation and evolution of anti-Chinese racial politics from North America to Australia to South Africa, which led to restrictive and exclusionary measures.

Access to Capital after the Poor People’s Campaign

November 21, 2013 // 2:30pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
As we mark the 45th Anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Poor People’s Campaign, we must consider the mixed legacy of one element of their platform, the demand that access to capital be expanded.

WordPower: Written Constitutions and British Worlds

November 18, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The proliferation of new written constitutions after 1787 presented British governments with both opportunities and challenges. By way of its empire and international heft – and increasingly in order to compete with the US – the UK came to draft and influence more constitutions in more parts of the world than any other power.

The Other Welfare: Supplemental Security Income and U.S. Social Policy

November 04, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Supplemental Security Income, passed in 1972 during an innovative and expansive phase of the American welfare state, marked an effort to do welfare right. But economic and political circumstances, as well as the contingencies of the moment, all combined to turn the program into a source of controversy over such things as whether parents coached their children to act “crazy” in an effort to secure benefits or whether immigrants deserved benefits.
Karyna Korostelina

Constructing Nation: National Narratives of History Teachers in Ukraine

October 28, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Karina Korostelina examined the use of historical narratives as an element of nation building in Ukraine, and analyzed the role of history teachers in this process. Based on 60 semi-structural interviews with history teachers in Ukraine, the speaker described three major national narratives used by history teachers to produce specific meaning of social identity among school pupils.

Indonesia and the World, 1965-66

October 21, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Pro-communist coup, military counter-coup, and subsequent mass killings in Indonesia in 1965/66 represent one of the major dramas of the Cold War. The powerful domestic impact of those events continues to haunt Indonesia until today, while the role of foreign actors remains largely hidden. Basing their talk on the first international academic conference held on this subject on Indonesian territory (in 2011), the speakers will introduce their edited book, Indonesia and the World, 1965-66, discuss international complicities, and address the current state of debate.

Revolutionary Mosquitoes: Malaria, Yellow Fever, and Independence in the Americas, 1776-1825

October 07, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
John McNeill argues that yellow fever and malaria, both mosquito-borne diseases, helped make the Americas free. In the campaigns of 1780-81 in the Carolinas and Virginia, in the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804, in the wars of independence in the Spanish Americas of 1808-25, locally born and raised soldiers and militia enjoyed a strong advantage over European troops in terms of their resistance to these two infections. Did disease tip the military balance?

Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe

October 03, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Martin K. Dimitrov, Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, will speak on the puzzling durability of communist autocracies in Eastern Europe and Asia, the the longest-lasting type of non-democratic regime to emerge after World War I.

Pages