History Events

‘Take Your Choice!’: Historical Reflections on the Act of Voting

April 07, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The secret ballot is now considered the gold standard for fair elections around the globe. However, in the aftermath of the American and French Revolutions, voting in secrecy held little immediate mass appeal in the US or Europe, and the secret ballot was used in combination with a wide variety of voting techniques. The history of the fraught introduction of the secret ballot on both sides of the Atlantic provides an opportunity to explore how conceptions of the business of choice-making have changed since the Age of Revolutions and also to reconsider how we vote today.

Overcoming History's Hurdles: Rising Above the Challenges Facing Relations Between Japan, Korea, and China

April 02, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Asia Program
Relations between three of Asia’s biggest economies are at their lowest in decades, as growing nationalistic fervor overwhelms multiple common challenges facing Seoul, Tokyo, and Beijing. Why are the three governments stumbling in history’s hurdles?

A History of the Iraqi Crisis: France, the United States, and Iraq, 1991-2003

March 28, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
Frédéric Bozo will speak on his new book "A History of the Iraqi Crisis: France, the United States, and Iraq, 1991-2003". Based on exclusive French archival sources and numerous interviews with former officials in both countries, Frédéric Bozo retraces the history of the international crisis that culminated in the 2003 Iraqi conflict.

Why We Fight: The Politics of World War II

March 24, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The conventional wisdom suggests that moderates matter little. In her new book, Why We Fight: Congress and the Politics of World War II, Nancy Beck Young proves otherwise. Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman faced a fractious Congress riven by hardcore ideologues, circumstances that empowered moderates—from both parties—to cut deals on economic but not social justice policies. The dominant patterns for postwar politics emerged with liberalism seeming less oriented toward the welfare state and more to the vital center warfare state.

CANCELLED - Waking from the Dream Part 1: Martin Luther King's Last Victory

March 17, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Most Americans have a distorted memory of the decline and fall of the Civil Rights Movement, David Chappell will argue. Press coverage at the time, and retrospective accounts from academia and mass media, blew the riots that followed the King assassination out of proportion.

Foreign Policy by Analogy: U.S. Decision-Making and the Uses of the Vietnam War

March 10, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Over the four decades since U.S. forces came home from Vietnam, Americans have fiercely debated the lessons that the nation should draw from its longest and most controversial war. Mark Atwood Lawrence will suggest a scheme for making sense of how historians, polemicists, politicians, and other commentators have used – and will likely continue to use – the Vietnam analogy in thinking about policy decisions.

Cancelled--Then and Now

March 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
To the inclement weather, this event has been cancelled. Join us for a presentation by former Kennan Institute scholar and Russian novelist, Vladimir Voinovich. Voinovich will discuss his time researching in the United States during the period of perestroika and events in Russia today from his unique perspective. A discussion period will follow his remarks. Attendees are invited to a reception immediately following the event.

North Korea after Jang Sung Taek and the Outlook for Inter-Korean Relations

February 28, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
The purge and execution of Jang Sung Taek was caused by the combination of a struggle over economic interests and political power as well as shortcomings of the Military-first System. While it is too early to determine what the consequences of Jang’s execution are in terms of the political stability and future policy directions of the Kim Jong Un regime, this panel will explore some possibilities, particularly in terms of inter-Korean relations.
Podcast

Cyprus - Prospects and Challenges: Looking Ahead to 2014

February 28, 2014 // 12:30pm1:30pm
Global Europe Program
It has been forty years since hostilities divided the Republic of Cyprus, yet the discovery of hydrocarbon reserves in the Eastern Mediterranean indicate that 2014 could be a year of possibility for the island nation. The potential development of these hydrocarbon resources could provide an opportunity for Cyprus to become a major regional player.

Australia's Historic Minimum Wage: A World History Approach

February 24, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Histories of the minimum wage are usually written within national analytic frameworks. Research in the New York Public Library on the first minimum wage, legislated in Victoria, Australia, in 1896, convinced historian Marilyn Lake that a world history approach was necessary, one that located this experiment in “state socialism” in the context of both the longue duree of imperial labor relations and encounters between the subjects of the British and Chinese empires in the new world of urban Melbourne.

Pages