Human Rights Events

Human Rights Before Carter

December 08, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Underlying much of the writing on United States foreign relations is the conviction that human rights were of limited consequence in policymaking during the 1960s and the early 1970s. Snyder's current research, however, shows that efforts to emphasize human rights began in the 1960s, driven by nonstate and lower-level actors and facilitating the issue’s later prominence due to the development of the networks and tactics critical to greater institutionalization of human rights in these years.
Photo: Wenceslas Square, 17 November, 1989
Webcast

Promoting Free Media: Informing the 1989 Velvet Revolution and the Challenge Today

October 16, 2014 // 2:00pm6:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
Czechs and Slovaks regained their freedom in November 1989 through non-violent protests in Prague, Bratislava, and other towns of then Czechoslovakia. Their Velvet Revolution climaxed a decade of renewed civic challenges to a repressive Communist regime that began with Charter 77 dissidents including Vaclav Havel and accelerated after 1986. Twenty five years after the Velvet Revolution, Europe today is whole and free, but democracy and prerequisite independent media are on the decline in much of the former Soviet Union and elsewhere. RFE/RL, now operating from Prague, VOA, Radio Free Asia, Middle East Broadcasting Network, and Radio Marti, all publicly funded by the U.S. Congress, work to redress the information deficit.

"They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide"

August 14, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Kennan Institute
Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–1916 were committed.

Freedom of Expression in Mexico: Analyzing the Impact of the Telecom Reform

July 31, 2014 // 9:00am10:30am
Mexico Institute
The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, in collaboration with Freedom House, hosted a discussion of the impact of the Telecom Reform. A panel of leading thinkers discussed the telecommunications reform and its implications for freedom of expression, as well as the ongoing debate about the reform’s secondary legislation.
Webcast

Underage: Addressing Reproductive Health and HIV in Married Adolescents

July 30, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
In July, thousands of people attended the 20th International AIDS Conference and the 2014 Girls Summit to work towards an AIDS-free generation and ending child and forced marriage. But such attention is rare; by and large, these girls are invisible to development efforts.

Book Launch—Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries

July 29, 2014 // 11:00am12:15pm
Asia Program
The garments and textiles sector is one of the world’s oldest export industries. It has often served as the “starter” industry for many countries, especially in Asia. Dr. Saxena’s book, based on original, in-depth research in three different Asian countries, casts light on some of the significant policy and attitudinal shifts that have occurred in this industry.
Webcast

Nutrition and the Continuum of Care: Pre-Conception to the Post-Natal Period

July 28, 2014 // 2:00pm5:00pm
Maternal Health Initiative
Good nutrition is very important for the health of women and their babies. Iron, zinc, and iodine deficiencies can lead to malnutrition, which increases susceptibility to disease and reduces immunity, productivity, and development.
Webcast

Migration of Central American Minors: Causes and Solutions

July 24, 2014 // 11:30am12:30pm
Latin American Program
Foreign Ministers of Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala discuss the regional perspective to the humanitarian crisis and unaccompanied minors.
Webcast

World Population Day 2014: Youth Engagement and the Sustainable Development Agenda

July 10, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
This year’s World Population Day focuses on youth engagement and the future of the global development agenda as the Millennium Development Goals expire next year. Young people are the key to building a sustainable future because the choices they make now will reverberate for decades to come.
Webcast

Religious Intolerance in Pakistan and the Plight of Religious Minorities

June 04, 2014 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Asia Program
In recent years, Pakistan—a Sunni Muslim majority country with Shia Muslim, Christian, and Hindu minorities—has been convulsed by sectarian violence. More than 2,000 people have been killed in sectarian attacks since 2008, and last year sectarian killings rose by more than a fifth from 2012.

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