Human Rights Events

Webcast

Common Crime and Organized Crime in Latin American Cities: Commonalities and Differences

May 19, 2010 // 8:30am3:15pm
Latin American Program
A conference to deepen the understanding of the connection between existing levels of common crime and the growing presence of organized crime in the region.
Webcast

You Are the Media: How Iranians "Democratized" the Media

May 14, 2010 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Iran Davar Ardalan, Civic Journalist, Formerly of NPR News

Religion and Values in the Formation of a Democratic Public Space in Latin America

March 22, 2010 // 12:30pm1:30pm
Latin American Program
Catalina Romero discusses the role of the Catholic Church in development of democracy in Peru.

Rethinking Human Trafficking

March 01, 2010 // 7:00am2:45pm
Middle East Program
Denise Brennan, Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center and Associate Professor, Anthropology, Georgetown University; Elizabeth Bernstein, Assistant Professor, Women's Studies and Sociology, Barnard College; Florrie Burke, Consultant, Freedom Network USA; Peter Kwong, Professor, Asian American Studies and Urban Affairs and Planning, Hunter College; Professor, Sociology, Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Moderator: Sonya Michel, Director, United States Studies, Woodrow Wilson Center; Pardis Mahdavi, Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center and Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Pomona College; Laura Agustín, Independent Scholar, London, United Kingdom; Rhacel Parreñas, Professor, American Civilization and Sociology, Brown University; Dina Haynes, Associate Professor of Law, New England School of Law; Moderator: Denise Brennan, Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center and Associate Professor, Anthropology, Georgetown University; Carole S. Vance, Associate Clinical Professor, Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health and Department of Anthropology, Columbia University; Sealing Cheng, Assistant Professor, Women's Studies, Wellesley College; Nicole Constable, Professor, Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh; Noy Thrupkaew, Fellow, Open Society Institute; Moderator: Pardis Mahdavi, Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center and Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Pomona College

Islam at the EU Border: Muslim Minorities in Greece and Bulgaria

February 23, 2010 // 1:00pm2:30pm
Global Europe Program
Over the last 20 years, Bulgaria and Greece have pursued variable and divergent policies toward their Muslim minorities. During a brief period near the end of the Communist regime, Bulgaria forced Turks to assimilate. This policy was abandoned by the democratic government that took power in the 1990s. At the same time, Greece recognized its Muslim minority and facilitated the "Turkification" of its Muslim citizens throughout the 1980s, but then abandoned that policy by blocking minority rights in the 1990s. Harris Mylonas suggested that these policy shifts are commonly explained by assumptions or models that link minority treatment, regime type, ideology and leadership personalities. Rejecting these hypotheses, Mylonas argued that the structure of the international system was the most salient indicator influencing the treatment of Muslim minorities in both countries.

Human Rights in Post-Communist Transitions: Fulfillment or Betrayal?

February 22, 2010 // 11:00am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
The book "Human Rights and Their Limits" shows that the concept of human rights has developed in waves: each call for rights served the purpose of social groups that tried to stop further proliferation of rights once their own goals were reached. While defending the universality of human rights as norms of behavior, Osiatynski admits that the philosophy on human rights does not need to be universal.

Banning Headscarves in Bulgaria: Reflections on the Debate over Religious Symbols in Public Schools

January 14, 2010 // 11:00am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
n Europe, the issue of headscarves has the power to expose a variety of social cleavages because it instantly provokes strong stances on matters such as national identity, religion, gender and human rights. This issue also reflects the way in which states set priorities within the broad category of human rights they are obliged to protect. Through her analysis of headscarf bans in Bulgarian schools, Kristen Ghodsee illustrated how a young postcommunist democracy has attempted to create a coherent policy on headscarves while balancing its commitments to multiple constituencies in the US, its fellow EU member states as well as its own diverse population.
Webcast

Book Discussion: Murder in the Name of Honor: The True Story of One Woman's Heroic Fight Against an Unbelievable Crime

October 26, 2009 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
"Honor killings" claim the lives of 5,000 women every year. Murder in the Name of Honor breaks the silence surrounding this crime with personal stories, and describes the author's battle to change outdated laws and expose governments that turn a blind eye to the murder of women.
Webcast

Sexual Violence Against Minors: Scope, Consequences, and Implications

October 20, 2009 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Sexual violence against minors is a critical global health issue, argue experts, yet ethics and methodology issues make conducting research on this disturbing problem difficult.
Webcast

Traffic Jam: Gender, Labor, Migration and Trafficking in Dubai

October 09, 2009 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Pardis Mahdavi, Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Pomona College

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