International Security Events

Webcast

Global Authoritarians and the Arab Spring: New Challenges for U.S. Diplomacy

January 29, 2013 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Middle East Program
The Arab uprisings of December 2011 and beyond coincided with the efforts of an ad hoc group of global authoritarian states—led by China, Russia, and Iran—to take advantage of these momentous events to enhance their diplomatic and strategic leverage in the Middle East and, in so doing, to defend their own authoritarian agendas at home and abroad. Brumberg and Heydemann present the main outlines of a joint USIP-Wilson Center paper. This event is the first in a series of five papers and presentations on “The Changing Security Architecture in the Middle East.”
Webcast

Book Launch--Eating Grass: The Making of the Pakistani Bomb

January 15, 2013 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Asia Program
The launch of an important new book on Pakistan's nuclear weapons program.
Webcast

A Safe and Smart Border

December 12, 2012 // 9:00am12:00pm
Canada Institute
Please join the Canada Institute for the launch of its 15th One Issue, Two Voices publication exploring the recent attempts to make the Canada-U.S. border safer and more efficient. American author Christopher Sands, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, and Canadian author Laura Dawson, President of Dawson Strategic, will discuss the findings of their respective essays and offer analysis on the progress of negotiations on both Beyond the Border and the Regulatory Cooperation Council.

Nuclear Statecraft: History and Strategy in America’s Atomic Age

November 29, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
International Security Studies
We are at a critical juncture in world politics. Nuclear strategy and policy have risen to the top of the global policy agenda, and issues ranging from a nuclear Iran to the global zero movement are generating sharp debate. The historical origins of our contemporary nuclear world are deeply consequential for contemporary policy, but it is crucial that decisions are made on the basis of fact rather than myth and misapprehension. In Nuclear Statecraft, Francis J. Gavin challenges key elements of the widely accepted narrative about the history of the atomic age and the consequences of the nuclear revolution.
Webcast

Live Broadcast of NPR's Talk of the Nation

November 29, 2012 // 2:00pm4:00pm
In this National Conversation event, NPR will be broadcasting live Talk of the Nation at the Wilson Center. Expert panelists David Ignatius and Robert Kagan will discuss the foreign policy opportunities and risks that President Obama faces in his second term; Graham Allison, Cheng Li, and Ashley Tellis will discuss lessons from the Cold War; and Wilson Center CEO Jane Harman will describe her vision of a world where there are as many women leaders as men.
Webcast
Podcast

Successful Citizen Security Initiatives in Bogotá, Medellín, and Cali, Colombia: Are They Sustainable and Replicable?

November 29, 2012 // 9:00am1:00pm
Latin American Program
A discussion on citizen security initiatives in Colombia.
Webcast

China as a Global Power: Contending Views from China

November 15, 2012 // 9:30am4:30pm
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
The Wilson Center and the George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs’ Sigur Center for Asian Studies invite notable scholars, policy makers, and thought leaders to discuss China’s status as an emerging global power. Breakout panel sessions highlight Chinese views on national security and defense, economics, and U.S.-China relations.
Photo by Mona Youssef
Webcast

Lebanon and the Arab World in Transition

November 14, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Fuad Siniora, former Prime Minister of Lebanon, discussed the dynamism of the Arab Spring and expressed optimism that current trends can lead to greater dialogue and democracy in the Middle East.

Is There a Sound U.S. Policy towards Russia?

November 13, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Four U.S. administrations have held office since the collapse of communism and the USSR. Edward Lozansky contends that not a single one has developed a truly sound Russia policy, but argues that it is important to do so: “During difficult and dangerous times it is better to have Russia on our side of the barricades.” What changes would be needed to edge the United States toward a truly productive relationship with Russia?

The Limits of Detente: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1969-1973

November 08, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
In "The Limits of Detente," Craig Daigle draws on newly released documents to shed new light on how the 1973 Arab-Israeli War was the result of not only tension and competing interest between Arabs and Israelis, but also policies adopted in both Washington and Moscow. Between 1969 and 1973, the Middle East in general and the Arab-Israeli conflict in particular emerged as a crucial Cold War battleground where the limits of detente appeared in sharp relief.

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