International Security Events

The 2015 NPT Review Conference: Challenges and Opportunities

September 28, 2012 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
With Susan F. Burk, Special Representative of the President for Nuclear Nonproliferation, Department of State. Co-sponsored by International Security Studies at the Wilson Center and the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
Webcast

Iran, Iraq, and the GCC: New Realities in Persian Gulf Security

September 28, 2012 // 9:00am12:00pm
Middle East Program
As Iraq strengthens its political, defense, and security capabilities, Iran’s claims to hegemony in the Gulf and over Iraq appear to be weakening. Professors David Siddhartha Patel, Mohsen Milani, and F. Gregory Gause will examine Iraqi, Iranian, and Gulf Arab perceptions of a shifting balance of power in the region and its implications for strategic planning and regional stability. Roy Mottahedeh will analyze the role and influence of the Shi’a clerics and institutions in Iraq and Iran on politics and governance.

Thirteen Days and More: A Soviet Perspective on the Cuban Missile Crisis

September 24, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Fifty years ago, the world spent thirteen days transfixed as the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. engaged in a contest of wills over placement of Soviet missiles in Cuba. Svetlana Savranskaya will discuss behind-the-scenes maneuvers by Soviet second-in-command Anastas Mikoyan, revealing that the crisis lasted into November and involved plans by the U.S.S.R. to leave tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba, foiled not by U.S. resolve, but by Fidel Castro’s own actions.

The Global Offensive: The United States, the Palestine Liberation Organization, and the Making of the Post-Cold War Order

September 24, 2012 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Cold War International History Project
In "The Global Offensive," historian Paul Thomas Chamberlin offers new insights into the rise of the Palestine Liberation Organization in its full international context.
Webcast

Terror and North America: The Causes and Directions of Cross-Border Extremist Activity

September 19, 2012 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Canada Institute
Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, many American policymakers have grown increasingly concerned about terrorists or terrorist materials being smuggled into the United States from Canada. The myth that the 9/11 hijackers arrived in the United States through Canada contributed to the passage of laws that have increased the “thickness” of the border and hindered trade in the name of collective security. Do these rules safeguard against the true vectors of North American extremism? The Canada Institute’s “Terror and North America: The Causes and Directions of Cross-Border Extremist Activity” will examine how and why extremists travel between Canada and the United States, what effect these crossings have on our national security, and what possible policy solutions exist to better police the border.

OFF-SITE CONFERENCE: United Atoms in a Divided World: The Early History of the International Atomic Energy Agency

September 16, 2012 // 7:30pmSeptember 18, 2012 // 3:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
The Department of Contemporary History at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Wilson Center's Nuclear Proliferation International History Project will host an international conference on the history of the IAEA during the cold war years. The conference will cover a wide range of issues, including the creation of the Agency, its role in the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and the Agency's technical programs. Beyond that, the conference seeks to discuss the cultural, societal, and economic context of the IAEA's early history.
Webcast

Combating Extremism Through Education: Lessons from Pakistan and Across the Muslim World

September 11, 2012 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Asia Program
A top education policy official in Pakistan discusses how his country--and the wider Muslim World--can fight radicalism through revitalized policies that increase access to science and technology education.

The 1967 War and the Demise of Arab Nationalism

September 10, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The defeat of Egypt and Syria in the 1967 is often described as a deathblow to pan-Arabism, and it did indeed gravely undermine the regime of Gamal Abdel Nasser. Egyptians, Syrians and Palestinians had in fact already begun to shift towards narrower nation-state nationalism even before the 1967 war, which merely confirmed this reorientation.
Webcast

Will the Ongoing Nuclear Talks with Iran Yield Better Results than Past Efforts?

September 07, 2012 // 10:00am12:00pm
Middle East Program
Experts who participated in a February 2011 seminar on the Brazilian-Turkish mediation with Iran return to the Wilson Center to assess the ongoing negotiations and possible outcomes.
Webcast
Podcast

Japan’s Middle East Policy since 9/11

July 25, 2012 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Asia Program
Japan’s policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and, more broadly, on Middle East issues generally has been shaped by two key factors: Tokyo’s quest for oil, and its awareness of the wider international diplomatic and political setting. Unfortunately for Japan, these two considerations have frequently pushed Japanese policy makers in opposite directions. Historically, Japan has preferred a low-key approach to the region. But in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, Tokyo has faced increasing pressure to become more engaged--more specifically, to contribute to the U.S.-led war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Does Japan aspire to be a relevant player in the Middle East? Can it play such a role, if it wishes to do so? Wilson Center visiting scholar Yuka Uchida will discuss these and related issues as she explores the post-9/11 evolution of Japanese policy in the broader Middle East.

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