Migration Events

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Russian Citizenship: From Empire to Soviet Union

March 25, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
"Russian Citizenship" is the first book to trace the Russian state’s citizenship policy throughout its history. Focusing on the period from the mid-nineteenth century to the consolidation of Stalin’s power in the 1930s, Eric Lohr considers whom the state counted among its citizens and whom it took pains to exclude. His research reveals that the Russian attitude toward citizenship was less xenophobic and isolationist and more similar to European attitudes than has been previously thought—until the drive toward autarky after 1914 eventually sealed the state off and set it apart.
Webcast
Podcast

Is the Border More Efficient? More Secure? — Progress and Challenges in Managing the U.S.-Mexico Border

February 27, 2013 // 1:30pm3:30pm
Mexico Institute
In 2009, the Pacific Council on International Policy and the Mexican Council on Foreign Affairs convened the Binational Task Force on the United States-Mexico Border. The group issued a series of recommendations regarding border management, which were detailed in the report, “Managing the United States-Mexico Border: Cooperative Solutions to Common Challenges.” Now, as border management plays a key role in the debate over immigration reform, the Task Force will reconvene to evaluate progress in managing the U.S.-Mexico border.
Webcast

Young and Undocumented: The New American Story

February 21, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Latin American Program
Four members of Hoyas for Immigrant Rights, a student advocacy organization at Georgetown University, presented a panel discussion on being young and undocumented.
Webcast

Climate Change and Migration in Mexico: A Report Launch

February 15, 2013 // 9:00am10:30am
Environmental Change and Security Program
The conversation around immigration and Mexico has long been tied to the United States and the prevailing economic conditions in both countries. But a new report from the Royal United Services Institute argues that as temperatures rise and precipitation patterns change over the course of the next century, climate too will increasingly become a driver of both internal and international migration in Mexico.
Webcast

The Role of Azerbaijan’s Post-Conflict National Narrative in Limiting Refugees’ and IDPs’ Integration into Mainstream Society

February 11, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Nagorno Karabakh is often referred to as one of the former Soviet Union’s “frozen conflicts” with little explanation of how the conflict “froze” or might “thaw.” Jennifer S. Wistrand, Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute draws upon twenty-two months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Azerbaijan, shedding light on some of the socio-cultural factors impeding both the peaceful resolution of the status of the region on a geopolitical level and the “successful” integration of Azerbaijan’s refugees and IDPs into mainstream society. Particular attention will be paid to the long-term socio-economic and mental health consequences of not resolving the status quo, especially for refugee and IDP youth.

Immigration Reform in Russia

February 07, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Russia receives the second most immigrants in the world after the United States. Due to this fact, immigration reform and the national migration concept have been the primary focus of federal migration policy debates in recent years. Olga Gulina, Law Institute, Samara and Alisa Oblezova, Perm State University will offer their views on Russian immigration law and enforcement and the national migration concept adopted in June 2012.
Webcast

Strengthening Responses to Climate Variability in South Asia

February 07, 2013 // 9:00am10:30am
Environmental Change and Security Program
Climate change and conflict can create a self-reinforcing feedback loop: Climate change exacerbates existing conflicts, while conflict makes adapting to climate change more difficult, said Janani Vivekananda of International Alert at the Wilson Center on February 7. She presented the results of nine case studies conducted in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal to find how communities are affected by and adapting to climate change in conflict-prone settings.

Forced Labor in Modern Russia: Questions about Legal Responsibility and the Protection of Worker’s Rights

December 10, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Prohibition of forced labor is one of the fundamental principles of labor law in Russian Federation. However, the analysis of enforcement practice shows that this principle remains declarative. The Labor Code provisions concerning individual labor disputes stipulates no specific measures to protect worker’s rights in forced labor cases. Alisa Oblezova, Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholar and Senior Lecturer, Labor Law and Social Security Department, Perm State University, investigates the different questions concerning employer’s liability for the use of forced labor, as well as methods for the protection of workers, including migrant workers, and makes an overview of proposed amendments to current legislation.
Webcast
Podcast

The Decisive Vote?

December 10, 2012 // 9:00am11:00am
Mexico Institute
Join us for a discussion on the importance of the Latino vote and how it played out on November 6. Who voted, where and what difference did they make? What happened in a key battleground states? And what are the likely consequences for immigration reform and other policy issues?
Webcast

The World at 7 Billion: Building a Sustainable Future

December 05, 2012 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Brazil Institute
Jack Goldstone (George Mason University) is joined by Suzanne Ehlers (Population Action International) and Matthew Erdman (USAID) to discuss the implications of seven billion people and counting for the environment in the final 2012 installment of the joint Wilson Center-George Mason University Managing the Planet series.

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