North America Events

Working Together to End Violence against Women: The Experience of Russia and the US

March 05, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
A panel of Russian and American experts will discuss the issue of gender-based violence and the ways in which it can be addressed in various cultural contexts.
Webcast

Strengthening Regional Competitiveness: An Update on the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue

March 04, 2015 // 9:30am11:00am
Mexico Institute
The Mexico Institute is pleased to host several U.S. government representatives to discuss the accomplishments of the U.S.-Mexico High Level Economic Dialogue and priorities in U.S.-Mexico economic cooperation for the coming year.
Webcast

The Changing Face and Changing Roles of the Foreign Service

February 25, 2015 // 10:30am11:45am
For more than two decades, the US Department of State, USAID and other foreign affairs agencies have worked to ensure that the Foreign Service looks more like America. Success in that effort could contribute immeasurably to the United States’ global leadership on a range of issues including gender equality, democracy and minority rights. A panel of experts will question if the Foreign Service has been successful in these efforts and explore how it must continue to evolve in a rapidly changing world.
Webcast

Authorizing Military Action Against ISIL: Geography, Strategy and Unanswered Questions

February 23, 2015 // 2:00pm3:00pm
For the first time in his Administration, President Barack Obama has submitted to Congress a formal request for additional authority to use military force. Is his draft Authorization for Use of Military Force against ISIL “alarmingly broad,” as The New York Times worries, or a narrow set of handcuffs? Does it empower the Presidency or create—as Senator John McCain put it—“535 Commanders-in-Chief”? From different angles, many ask: Does the proposed AUMF reflect sound law and sound strategy?
Webcast

Crossroads or Crisis? The Future of the Mexican Left

February 23, 2015 // 9:00am10:30am
Mexico Institute
The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute is pleased to a discussion on the future of the left in Mexico and the challenges the country faces.

Discussion with Quebec Minister of International Relations and La Francophonie

February 20, 2015 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Canada Institute
The Canada Institute hosted a discussion with Quebec’s Minister for International Relations and La Francophonie Christine St-Pierre, moderated by Canada Institute Director David Biette.
Podcast

U.S. Arms to Ukraine: Tilting the Balance?

February 05, 2015 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Kennan Institute
What would be the outcome of changing policy and sending military assistance to Ukraine? Would such a step help Ukraine resist the aggression or further escalate the war? How would it change America’s role in the conflict?
Webcast

Falling Oil Prices: Changing Implications for Global Producers

February 04, 2015 // 1:30pm4:15pm
Canada Institute
As the price of oil continues to fall, the Wilson Center convened an expert global panel, assembled from Russia, Colombia, Canada, Iran, and Nigeria, to discuss the economic and political repercussions of depressed energy prices, as well as the effects of the lower prices on competitiveness and investment.
Webcast

Report Launch: The U.S.-Mexico Border Economy in Transition

February 03, 2015 // 9:00am11:00am
Mexico Institute
The Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to the launch of the report "The U.S.-Mexico Border Economy in Transition." This report is drawn from a series of four U.S.-Mexico Regional Economic Competitiveness Forums in order to engage border region stakeholders in a process to collectively generate a shared vision and policy recommendations to strengthen economic competitiveness.

Book Talk: "US Foreign Policy and Defense Strategy: Evolution of an Incidental Superpower"

January 30, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
Does the United States have a plan for how it hopes to achieve its objectives on the global stage? Or is its position in the world an accident of history? Perhaps it is better to understand the United States as an incidental superpower—responding and adjusting to changes in the international system. If that is the case, given the instability and flux of current events, what might the future pattern of U.S. foreign and defense policy look like?

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