Poland Events

Empowering Revolution: America, Poland, and the Moderates who Ended the Cold War

October 20, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Based on significant new international research, Domber reassesses the nature of Western influence on the end of the Cold War, highlighting where Soviet reforms created space for change in Eastern Europe and rejecting claims of any direct U.S. responsibility for the collapse of Communism.

Art Exhibit: "From War to Victory: Poland 1939-1989"

October 01, 2014 // 9:00amOctober 10, 2014 // 5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
“From War to Victory: Poland 1939-1989” features exhibitions from the Institute of National Remembrance that tell the history of Poland from the Second World War through the end of the Cold War. This exhibit will be on display in the Memorial Hallway of the Woodrow Wilson Center from 1 October-10 October, is open to the public and admission is free.

From Free Europe to Free Poland: Free Europe Committee in the Cold War

September 05, 2014 // 9:00amSeptember 06, 2014 // 6:00pm
Cold War International History Project
A symposium and workshop, to be held in Gdansk in September 2014, will assemble senior and junior European and American scholars working on Western policy toward Eastern Europe during the Cold War, individual Free Europe Committee projects, and reactions and countermeasures of the Communist regimes. The Gdansk meeting will aim to catalog and synthesize existing research and stimulate additional collaborative scholarship on the impact of a major Cold War instrument of American soft power.

North Korean War Orphans in Transnational Educational Exchange

August 27, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
More than 100,000 children from both North and South Korea were orphaned during the Korean War. In 1953, the North Korean government dispatched 1,200 orphans to the People’s Republic of Poland to be educated at a boarding school transformed into an orphanage. The orphans were repatriated after six years, at the insistence of the North Korean government, as tensions between Pyongyang and its communist allies began to emerge. NKIDP Intern Intaek Hong examines the complicated process of how the orphans defined their identity based on their experience of interacting with their Polish teachers—who became like foster parents—and deploying their subjectivity in the process.
Webcast

Citizens, Subjects, and Slackers: Polish, Russian, and Ukrainian Attitudes Toward Paying Taxes

July 16, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
Marc Berenson's unique surveys of Poles, Russians, and Ukrainians, conducted from 2004 to 2012 regarding their attitudes towards paying taxes, illustrate that Polish citizens express a far greater willingness and support for paying taxes than Russian citizens, who, in turn, are more willing taxpayers than Ukrainian citizens. Unlike Poles, whose compliance is related to their trust in the state, and Russians, whose compliance is related to their fear of the state, Ukrainians, showing the lowest support for tax obedience, have reacted to state efforts to increase compliance with less fear and little trust.

From Memory to Mending: Lessons for Eastern Europe from Germany's Foreign Policy of Reconciliation

March 06, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
Whether hot or cold, conflict and contestation over history continue to be a staple of post-Soviet Eastern Europe twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

1989 After 1989: Memory in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe

March 14, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
The eastern European revolutions of 1989 were a watershed in global history. Despite this, in the two decades since, their meaning has become a source of debate. While they have been promoted as a founding myth for a newly unified Europe, eastern Europeans have repeatedly represented them as a moment of betrayal, martyrdom, liberation, victory, disappointment, loss, colonization, or nostalgia.
Webcast

Soviet Soft Power and the Polish Thaw, 1953-1957

September 20, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Though little is known about such efforts, Soviet cultural and propaganda institutions attempted to reach directly the hearts and minds of East European societies in Moscow’s new sphere of influence created after World War II. In the process, the Soviets squandered considerable human potential on their side, which could have promoted more effective soft power initiatives. Stalin’s death in 1953 offered new possibilities for reciprocal cultural relations and more flexible Soviet approach. Patryk Babiracki, Assistant Professor of History, University of Texas-Arlington, and Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute, will explain that other aspects of “the Thaw” in the USSR and Poland further complicated the work of Soviet international outreach institutions, revealing the limitations of Soviet soft power and of the Kremlin’s capacity to maintain empire.

Belarusian State Formation: Examining 1919-1939 Contestation in Poland's West Belarus

June 04, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
As modern Belarus seems to be caught in limbo between the West (EU\NATO) on one side, and Russia with her post-imperial ambitions on the other, it is still undecided where it really belongs. Some observers claim that the modern Belarusian state is Soviet by its origin and design, but there were also suppressed historical alternatives to it in the recent 20th century Belarusian past. Aliaksandr Paharely, Visiting Scholar, Center for Belarusian Studies, Southwestern College, Kansas, will address the putative evolutionary and revolutionary scenarios of social change and nation and states building that were debated in Poland’s West Belarus during the interwar years.
Webcast

A History of the Boycott: Economic Nationalism in Russian Poland, 1880-1914

March 05, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
“This history of Łódź is also a history of Russian imperialism,” noted Yedida Kanfer, Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute, at a 5 March 2012 Kennan Institute discussion. Kanfer examined the notions of economic nationalism and economic self-sufficiency as they developed in Russian Poland over the years 1880 through 1914. Specifically, the speaker examined those concepts through the prism of the city of Łódź, the ethnically diverse industrial center of Russian Poland.

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