Population Events

Webcast

Changing the World: How USAID’s 50 Years of Family Planning has Transformed People, Economies, and the Planet

June 26, 2015 // 10:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Join us, the current director of the Office of Population and Reproductive Health, and five former directors to discuss USAID’s history in family planning and future directions, including how the program fits into the Obama administration’s goal to end preventable child and maternal deaths and contributes to the global Family Planning 2020 movement.
Webcast

Mist of the Earth: Art and Sustainability

May 20, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Brazil Institute
On May 20, the Brazil Institute welcomes the "Mist of the Earth" art exhibit to Washington.
Webcast

The Sahel Beyond the Headlines: Population, Environment, and Security Dynamics

May 12, 2015 // 9:30am5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Speakers from the Sahel and US-based experts will engage in solutions-oriented policy dialogues that address demographic trends, reproductive health, food security, and peacebuilding. Additional cross-cutting themes throughout the discussion will include gender, youth, and health.

Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan

April 13, 2015 // 2:00pm4:15pm
Asia Program
With nearly 98 percent of the population believed to be nationals of the country, Japan can seem to be a racially homogenous society. For foreigners already calling Japan home, though, living in a country where there is little racial diversity can be a challenge. That includes those who are half-Japanese.

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

March 24, 2015 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.
Webcast

We Want What's Ours: Learning from South Africa's Land Restitution Process

March 19, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Africa Program
Professor Bernadette Atuahene led a discussion of her new book, We Want What’s Ours: Learning from South Africa’s Land Restitution Program (Oxford University Press, 2014). Her work is based on interviews that she conducted with over 150 South Africans who were forcibly removed from urban areas, and who received compensation through the land restitution program. The book provides an unbiased, bottom-up evaluation of the program’s successes and failures.
Webcast

Bridging the Gap: Family Planning, Rights, and Climate-Compatible Development

October 28, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
“There is no magic bullet or solution to resolving climate change quickly,” said the Population Reference Bureau’s Jason Bremner at the Wilson Center on October 28. “Our next 100 years will be far different from the last 100 or the last 1000…and it has become clear that nations will have to pursue many strategies in order to reduce emissions, build resilience, and adapt.”
Webcast

World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Book Launch)

October 23, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
With UN demographers more certain than ever that global population will reach between 10 and 12 billion by the end of the century, the challenge of building a sustainable future seems daunting. But according to Wolfgang Lutz, founding director of the Vienna-based Wittgenstein Center for Demography and Global Human Capital, these projections miss one crucial variable: increasing levels of education.
Webcast

Africa's Stalled Fertility Transition: Causes, Cures, and Consequences?

October 15, 2014 // 1:00pm3:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
“Sub-Saharan Africa’s young people are in effect the global labor force of the future,” says Wilson Center Fellow Jack Goldstone. “Whether they are productive, how large that cohort turns out to be, whether they find work or not, is going to have a bearing, I think, on all of us.”

Foreign Policy and Security Implications of Global Aging for the Future of U.S.-Japan Relations HELD IN TOKYO

October 09, 2014 // 10:00am5:30pm
Asia Program
The sixth annual joint U.S.-Japan public policy forum held with the Sasakawa Peace Foundation will focus on the foreign policy and security implications of an ageing society worldwide. This event is held in Tokyo, Japan.

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