Russia and Eurasia Events

Business, Power, and Property Rights in Russia after Crimea

November 17, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Kennan Institute
Twenty-three years after its emergence as an independent state, Russia’s institutions are still incomplete. It possesses open markets, competitive pricing, and appropriate fiscal tools to promote economic growth, but it lacks rule of law and independent courts. Paradoxically, Russia’s business community has never really championed private property rights. Instead most businesses have long operated under other countries' rules, essentially outsourcing the law to foreign jurisdictions. Vedomosti columnist and Wilson Center Fellow Maxim Trudolyubov discussed the changing economic environment in Russia in the aftermath of the Ukrainian Crisis.

Inside Georgia Today

November 13, 2014 // 10:30am12:00pm
Kennan Institute
The Kennan Institute held a town hall discussion on the latest developments in Georgia and the neighboring region with Ambassador Tedo Japaridze, former Georgian Foreign Minister and Ambassador to the United States, and now the Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee of the Georgian parliament. Wilson Center Global Fellow Ambassador Kenneth Yalowitz posed questions on Georgia's internal political and economic situation, developments with Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and Georgia's foreign relations.
Photo by RiMarkin

The Role of Ultra-Nationalism in Conflict and Crisis: Russia, Ukraine and the EU

November 12, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
This event highlighted the growing and complicated role of radical nationalist groups in European politics. It focused on the positions of Russian neo-fascist, fundamentalist, and ethnocentrist groups towards the Kremlin's recent foreign and domestic policies, as well as the complications resulting from Ukrainian nationalism in Kyiv's confrontation with Russia.The panel also addressed how Central and Western European populist and far right parties regard the events in Ukraine.
Webcast

Impact of Low Oil Prices: Petro Power or Petro Poverty?

October 31, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
As oil prices drop, The Wilson Center is focusing on the political and economic implications of lower petroleum prices, as long as they continue, in a number of key countries. Leading experts will speak to what the future could hold for Russia, Iraq, Nigeria, and Venezuela with an added perspective on Saudi pricing power.
Podcast

Teleconference Ukraine: Elections Amid Ceasefire and Conflict

October 24, 2014 // 10:00am11:00am
Kennan Institute
There is much riding on the early parliamentary elections in Ukraine on October 26. Ukrainians face an ongoing war despite the tenuous ceasefire in the Donbas region, and severe economic pressures. The desperate need for reform is still at the top of the agenda for Maidan activists who overthrew the Yanukovych regime in February, and for the international community which has pledged to support Ukraine financially through the difficult months ahead. How can the new Rada to be elected this Sunday make meaningful progress in the face of these daunting challenges?

“A Sort of Chautauqua”

October 23, 2014 // 4:00pm6:00pm
Kennan Institute
The Chautauqua is a traveling tent-show that originated in America during the 1800s. These traveling shows featured popular talks intended to edify and entertain, improve the mind and bring culture and enlightenment to the ears and thoughts of the hearer. It is a model that inspires Oleksandr Boichenko, a literary critic, publicist, essayist and translator from Chernivtsi, an emerging center for Ukrainian literature. Boichenko’s Chautauqua at the Wilson Center featured his writings and views on the impact of recent events, from the Maidan to the tenuous ceasefire, on Ukrainian culture.
Webcast

World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Book Launch)

October 23, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
With UN demographers more certain than ever that global population will reach between 10 and 12 billion by the end of the century, the challenge of building a sustainable future seems daunting. But according to Wolfgang Lutz, founding director of the Vienna-based Wittgenstein Center for Demography and Global Human Capital, these projections miss one crucial variable: increasing levels of education.

Ukraine, Russia, and the International Order

October 22, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Kennan Institute
Over the last twenty-five years, the ideal of an integrated Euro-Atlantic community including Russia has gradually faded, as new dividing lines seem to be hardening on the European continent. The Ukrainian crisis and conflict with Russia have effectively brought an end to the post-Cold War era; it remains an open question what will be the outlines and nature of the new era that follows. William H. Hill, former head of the OSCE Mission to Moldova, looks at the events in Ukraine from multiple vantage points. What happened in Ukraine and what are the prospects? What motivated Russia’s conduct during the crisis, and what are Moscow’s likely courses of action in the near and medium term? What are U.S. perceptions, motives, and likely responses to the crisis? Finally, what are the implications of the crisis for the Euroatlantic and global international order? Professor Hill shared his analysis on these questions and Kennan Institute Public Policy Scholar Michael Kofman provided commentary.
Webcast

Does Democracy Matter?

October 20, 2014 // 9:00am2:30pm
Kennan Institute
Taking stock of democracy promotion over the past 30 years, what are its strengths and weaknesses? If U.S. and European democracy promotion should be continued, how can it be better targeted and reformed to more effectively advance democratization in post-authoritarian societies? If such assistance programs deserve to be terminated, should there be alternative policies to support human rights and other aspects of pluralism?

Film Screening: "The Winter that Changed Us: The First Death"

October 17, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
The First Death is a short documentary film by Ukrainian independent film project Babylon'13, which details the Maidan movement's first casualty, Serhiy Nigoyan, who died on January 22nd, 2014 from gunshot wounds. Through interviews and live coverage of the events, the film makes the case that the deaths of Nigoyan and other protesters served as the catalyst that turned the movement from a demonstration into a revolution. Film Director Yuriy Gruzinov was joined by Wilson Center Senior Scholar and Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine William Miller to discuss the movie and the events in Kyiv that sparked the crisis.

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