Russia Events

Russian-Iranian Relations in the Shadow of Ukraine

March 23, 2015 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
The ongoing attempt to improve Iranian-Western relations is occurring at a time when Russian-Western ties have sharply deteriorated over Ukraine. Moscow has increased its efforts to improve its ties to Tehran. But while Moscow and Tehran share some common interests, they remain at odds over others.

The War in Ukraine: The Roots of Russian Conduct

March 19, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
A year after the annexation of Crimea and the start of hostilities in Eastern Ukraine, the sequence of events leading up to the crisis are well established. Yet these events find their origins in Russia's recent and distant past, as well as the EU's image of a modern, post-WWII Europe.
Webcast

Current Challenges to Euro-Atlantic Security: Strategies for Co-operation and Joint Solutions

March 17, 2015 // 8:45am5:30pm
The OSCE Security Days Conference, the first held outside of Vienna featured Foreign Ministers, Ambassadors, prominent leaders, and global policy makers on the current challenges to Euro-Atlantic security.

Working Together to End Violence against Women: The Experience of Russia and the US

March 05, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
**THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED**

“Legacy of Soviet Dissent for Russia's Post-Soviet Generations”

February 24, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Many young Russians, whether politically active or indifferent, know little about the dissidents of the Soviet era. They don’t understand what motivated people of the time to speak out, why some dissidents decided to leave the country, or what was the significance of samizdat, the “self-published” writings and poetry that people passed around in secret at the time. The Voice of America launched a documentary series in 2013 featuring interviews, documents, and narration to tell the stories from this part of Russian history.

Geopolitical Gambits and Ordinary Citizens: Attitudes in South-East Ukraine and Crimea

February 13, 2015 // 11:30am12:30pm
Kennan Institute
This talk presented the results of survey work conducted in December 2014 funded by the Political Science division of the National Science Foundation on evolving attitudes in conflict regions. The survey focuses on Southeast Ukraine (excluding the war zones of Donetsk and Luhansk) and Crimea, comparing attitudes towards Maidan, Russian actions, MH 17, Novorossiya, political actors, and NATO.

Property Rights and Wrongs In Russia Today

February 11, 2015 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
The protection of property rights remains one of the most contentious issues in present-day Russia. From historically weak ownership rights to unclear laws to the reliance on offshore accounts, Russian property rights consistently seem to be under threat. This panel discussed historical, legal, and political attempts to enforce property rights and why this issue continues to be so controversial today.
Podcast

U.S. Arms to Ukraine: Tilting the Balance?

February 05, 2015 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Kennan Institute
What would be the outcome of changing policy and sending military assistance to Ukraine? Would such a step help Ukraine resist the aggression or further escalate the war? How would it change America’s role in the conflict?

Film Screening: “Brothers in Arms: Stories from the Frontlines of the Russian-Ukrainian War”

February 02, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
The presentation featured episodes from their film and provided the opportunity to interact with the filmmakers, who shared their personal experiences and observations from the war zone.

Book Talk: "US Foreign Policy and Defense Strategy: Evolution of an Incidental Superpower"

January 30, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
Does the United States have a plan for how it hopes to achieve its objectives on the global stage? Or is its position in the world an accident of history? Perhaps it is better to understand the United States as an incidental superpower—responding and adjusting to changes in the international system. If that is the case, given the instability and flux of current events, what might the future pattern of U.S. foreign and defense policy look like?

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