Russia Events

Webcast

Local Media and Ethnic Politics in 21st-Century Russia

June 18, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
“Is local media, produced for Russia’s ethnic minorities and often in local languages, stoking ethnic conflict and hastening destabilization of the federation?” asked Kathryn Graber, Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute at a 18 June 2012 lecture. Graber studied the local, ethnic media of the people of the Republic of Buryatia, a semi-autonomous region of the Russian Federation that borders Lake Baikal. Rather than create ethnic strife between the Buryats and Russians, Graber found that local, ethnic media has produced a framework of titular nationalities that work together in the Russian Federation, and which supports positive and pacifist relationships that reaffirm the belief that as a national minority, ethnic peoples can belong both to an ethnic state and the larger Russian state.
Webcast
Podcast

Familiar Strangers in the Soviet Marketplace: Georgian Trade Networks between the Caucasus and Moscow

June 11, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
“Why were Georgian trade networks so successful?” asked Erik R. Scott, Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute, at an 11 June 2012 lecture. Georgian businessmen and their trade networks and products occupied a unique position in the informal economy in the Soviet Union and supplied many of the scarce and exotic goods Soviet consumers desired. Georgian trade networks exploited the mobility made possible by the porous internal borders of the Soviet Union. Scott characterized the Soviet Union as an “empire of diaspora” comprised of mobile ethnicities who could move and trade throughout the Union.

The Allies and the Role of Lend-Lease in WWII: The Russian View

May 29, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Cosponsored by the Russian-American Community Center of Florida, Open Dialogue (Moscow) and the Spiritual Diplomacy Foundation, in this discussion Nikolai Borodin, Director, Museum of the Allies and Lend-Lease in Moscow, will explore the history of the museum and the role of America in the Lend-Lease program during World War II. “The Museum of the Allies and Lend-Lease is a unique, one-of-a-kind museum,” said Borodin. The museum was established inside a former school and has been open for 8 years. Borodin said he wished to honor and show gratitude to the United States and its veterans who rendered aid to the Soviet Union during World War II. “Those years were a very trying time and the aid received from the U.S. was substantial,” he stated. In Russia, the museum is dedicated to the WWII allies but mainly to the American contribution.
U.S. President Obama meets with Russia's PM Putin in Moscow
Podcast

The National Conversation: Putin's Return & The U.S.-Russian Reset

May 23, 2012 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Kennan Institute
On May 7, Vladimir Putin began his third term as president of the Russian Federation. With the Russian political season over, and the American political season heating up, what are the implications of political transition for the important issues in the U.S.-Russian bilateral relationship?

Book Discussion: Stage Fright: Politics and the Performing Arts in Late Imperial Russia

May 14, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
“Were the performing arts in imperial Russia an outlet for opposition politics or ideas? The historiography of the era predicts the answer is yes, but the reality is actually the opposite,” said Paul du Quenoy, Associate Professor, Department of History and Archeology, American University of Beirut, at a 14 May 2012 Kennan Institute lecture. Presenting the research behind his book, Stage Fright: Politics and the Performing Arts in Late Imperial Russia, du Quenoy contended that theatrical artists and artistic institutions of the era avoided politics, or were at least resistant to staging productions critical of the state.

Geopolitics, States, and Networks in Central Eurasia

May 09, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Spotlight on Central Eurasia Series // Authors and scholars Alexander Cooley and Alexander Kupatadze discuss their research into the interplay of geopolitics and local networks across Central Asia. Cooley explores the dynamics of the new competition between Russia, China and the United States over the region since 9/11, as well as how small states’ interaction with great powers advances our understanding of how world politics actually works in the contemporary era of diminishing Western influence and rising new regional powers. Author Alexander Kupatadze will discuss the diverging trajectories of organized crime in post-Soviet Eurasia focusing on professional criminals (so-called vory-v-zakone) in Georgia and drug smuggling groups in Kyrgyzstan.

Police Reform and Corruption in Russia

May 07, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Vladimir Sergevnin, Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration and Director, Center for Applied Criminal Justice, Western Illinois University; and Editor, Law Enforcement Executive Forum, will address one of the critical issues of modern law enforcement segment of the Russian state: does police reform produce a new paradigm in controlling misconduct and corruption? What are some of the first results in reforming Russian police towards more accountability and professionalism?

St. Petersburg Regionalism as a Political Force: 1980s to 2010s

April 30, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Lev Lurye, cultural historian, St. Petersburg

Translating Judgments into Policy: The Influence of the European Court of Human Rights on the Russian Criminal Justice System

April 26, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
The Kennan Institute, in partnership with the ABA Rule of Law Initiative, will host a seminar consisting of leading Russian human rights experts visiting the U.S. as part of ABA ROLI’s Conditions of Confinement and Prison Reform Study Tour, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. The meeting will address Russian citizens’ use of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) as a tool for justice, its judgments on prison issues, and the court’s broader influence on the Russian judicial system.

"Angry Townspeople," the Internet, and the Market of Ideas: Vectors of Change in the Russian Public Sphere

April 23, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
The recent rise of public activity in Russia was facilitated by a quick growth of the number of users of Internet that has changed the configuration of the public sphere. How it affects the offer at the market of political ideas? What are the perspectives of political dialog? Is it possible to talk about the new quality of the practices of public communication? Olga Malinova, Chief Research Fellow, Institute of Scientific Information for Social Sciences, Russian Academy of Sciences, and Professor, Moscow State Institute of International Relations, Moscow, will argue that comparative analysis of electoral campaigns of 2011 and 2012 provides some evidence for answering these questions.

Pages