Security and Defense Events

Photo by Mona Youssef
Webcast

In the Mainstream: Religious Extremism in the Middle East and North Africa

July 11, 2014 // 9:00am11:00am
Middle East Program
Panelists discuss the rise and prominence of religious extremism in the MENA region. Although most attention and policies focus on the problem of violent religious extremism, non-violent religious extremism continues to spread in communities throughout the region. Both forms are significant in their ability to alter the social, cultural, and political landscapes of Muslim-majority countries. Speakers examine these issues and discuss how the United States and international community can address the rise of religious extremism in the MENA region.
Photo by Mona Youssef
Webcast

Whither the Palestinians

July 07, 2014 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Middle East Program
Iraq and Syria may be dominating the headlines, but the Israeli-Palestinian issue remains a volatile and unpredictable piece of the Middle Eastern puzzle. Join us as three veteran analysts and practitioners discuss the Palestinians and their politics, including the recent unity agreement, the impasse in the peace process, and the prospects for elections in the West Bank and Gaza. This event is part of The Joseph and Alma Gildenhorn Middle East Forum of the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center.
Podcast

What Is Causing the Sudden Flood of Unaccompanied Children from Central America?

June 30, 2014 // 10:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
As many as 52,000 unaccompanied minors from Central America have arrived at the U.S. border since October, 2013 with the possibility of another 60,000 arriving before the end of this year. In this Ground Truth Briefing, three experts on the ground in Central America will discuss this developing crisis.
Webcast

Mutual Security on Hold? Russia, the West, and European Security Architecture

June 16, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Global Europe Program
This year, the Munich Security Conference celebrated its 50th anniversary. These fifty years of substantive dialogue on security cooperation have existed against a changing political backdrop – from the tensions of the Cold War and the brutal conflict in the Western Balkans, to the attacks of September 11, 2001, the subsequent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the global “War on Terror.” Mutual security and the transatlantic relationship are once again faced with challenges in the form of the crisis in Ukraine. What does this crisis mean for mutual security, and how will it affect the security architecture in Europe?
Webcast

National Security and the Accelerating Risks of Climate Change

May 15, 2014 // 1:00pm2:30pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Climate change poses a serious threat to U.S. national security and is becoming a “catalyst for conflict” in vulnerable countries, according to a panel of retired military leaders.
Webcast

Why Do People Move? Research on Environmental Migration Coming of Age

May 14, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
When she finished her dissertation on migration as a response to climate change in 2003, it was one of only a handful of scholarly papers published on the topic that year, said Susana Adamo, an associate research scientist at Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network. But in the decade since, interest in climate migration has exploded – in 2012, more than 10 times as many papers were published.

Contested Waters – Maritime Delimitation Issues in Southeastern Europe

May 14, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Global Europe Program
In the past two decades, Southeastern Europe has changed dramatically, leaving behind the legacy of the bloody dissolution of the former Yugoslavia and confrontations in the Aegean Sea. Five countries in the region are now members of the EU and seven are NATO members. While the Southeast European mainland is largely at peace, several issues remain and new problems have emerged in the adjacent waters of the Balkan Peninsula. From the Adriatic to the Black Sea, maritime delimitation disputes are engaging the political, diplomatic and legal communities of the countries concerned. The most recent events in Crimea may further complicate the maritime map of the Black Sea. Wilson Center Scholar Agron Alibali will discuss how the spectrum of discussions, negotiations, agreements and adjudications currently underway represents a fascinating new development for international law in general and for international law of the sea in particular in this historical part of the Mediterranean.

New Terrorism Meets New Media

May 14, 2014 // 9:00am11:00am
Science and Technology Innovation Program
There is a clear trend of terrorist "migration" to online social media, including YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. This new arena of open and social systems presents new challenges and requires dramatic shifts in strategic thinking regarding national security and countering terrorism.

The Transatlantic Relationship in the Wake of Revelations about U.S. Foreign Surveillance & the Ongoing Ukrainian-Russian Crisis

May 08, 2014 // 3:00pm4:00pm
Global Europe Program
The transatlantic relationship, particularly from the German perspective, has been under great stress for almost a year due to revelations about U.S. foreign surveillance. Now the crisis with Ukraine and Russia threatens to add more strain. As voices in the U.S. and NATO call for a stronger response to Russia, Germany--with its preference for diplomatic over military instruments and its deep trade ties with Russia--is faced with hard choices. The transatlantic partnership remains crucial on these and other issues, such as the Middle East peace process, Iranian nuclear policy, and the challenge from China.

India’s Maoist Insurgency: Drivers and Policy Responses

May 06, 2014 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Asia Program
New Delhi has referred to India’s Maoist insurgency as the country’s biggest internal security challenge. What explains the re-emergence and expansion of Maoist violence in India’s rural areas over the last decade, and how should it be dealt with?

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