Southeast Europe Events

From Sarajevo, 1914 to Southeastern Europe, 2014: Wars, Transitions and Controversies

October 15, 2014 // 11:30am1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on recent scholarship and addressing recent controversies, John Lampe, traces the saga of Southeastern Europe from the explosive mixture of Balkan states and imperial borderlands before the First World War, through the trials that their successors faced during two world wars, the Cold War, and finally the wars of Yugoslavia's dissolution.

Symbolic Nation-Building in Croatia from the Homeland War to EU Membership

August 19, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on a recently published larger volume - Strategies of Symbolic Nation-Building in Southeast Europe – Vjeran Pavlakovic will analyze the nation and state building strategies of the Croatian elite since the country attained independence, following the Homeland War, 1991-1995. In his presentation, Pavlakovic will focus on the role of contested narratives and commemorative practices related to the wars of the 20th century in the political arena. The discussion will also address current attitudes and sentiments in Croatia towards the EU, following the country’s accession to the European Union in July, 2013.

Energy Security in the Black Sea Region

June 19, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Global Europe Program
The Global Europe Program recently hosted Martin Tsanov, an energy expert at the Center for the Study of Democracy in Bulgaria, who presented the most recent outlook on main energy security risks for Bulgaria and countries in the Black Sea region as based on the cutting-edge International Index of Energy Security Risks developed by the Institute for 21st Century Energy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
Webcast

The Roma and Human Rights: Challenges and Goals in 2014 – Lessons from the Past, Eyes to the Future

May 19, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Global Europe Program
The Roma have been persecuted ever since their arrival from the Indian subcontinent to Europe in the 14th Century and pervasive discrimination continues towards the Roma today. Why does a people so resilient still have to endure widespread exclusion, racism and discrimination? Experts from the fields of sociology, law, politics, and history will discuss the future of the Roma, including the prospect for Roma integration in Europe and the remaining challenges for granting the Roma population full human rights. They will also address the issue of Roma rights at the local, national, EU, and international levels.

Contested Waters – Maritime Delimitation Issues in Southeastern Europe

May 14, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
Global Europe Program
In the past two decades, Southeastern Europe has changed dramatically, leaving behind the legacy of the bloody dissolution of the former Yugoslavia and confrontations in the Aegean Sea. Five countries in the region are now members of the EU and seven are NATO members. While the Southeast European mainland is largely at peace, several issues remain and new problems have emerged in the adjacent waters of the Balkan Peninsula. From the Adriatic to the Black Sea, maritime delimitation disputes are engaging the political, diplomatic and legal communities of the countries concerned. The most recent events in Crimea may further complicate the maritime map of the Black Sea. Wilson Center Scholar Agron Alibali will discuss how the spectrum of discussions, negotiations, agreements and adjudications currently underway represents a fascinating new development for international law in general and for international law of the sea in particular in this historical part of the Mediterranean.

Ethnonationalist Conflict in Postcommunist States

April 29, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Why do ethnonational conflicts reach different degrees of violence? Why does violence continue to reoccur even after strong international intervention for conflict-resolution and democratization? To answer these questions, Maria Koinova combines research on civil wars with the study of non-violent majority-minority disputes by examining 5 degrees of violence in three cases – Bulgaria, Macedonia, and Kosovo – over a 20-year period.
Podcast

A Cyprus Negotiations Update: Why Prospects for a Peaceful and Lasting Settlement are Improving

March 10, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
The Cyprus dispute is more than a half-century old, yet the mood surrounding the latest round of UN-sponsored negotiations suggest that prospects for a peaceful and lasting settlement have markedly improved. Mr. Özdil Nami, representative of the Turkish Cypriot Community in charge of foreign affairs, will discuss the recent months’ developments, including the impact that regional hydrocarbon discoveries may be having on the talks, and what Turkish Cypriots hope to see happen as negotiations continue.

War Crimes, Youth Activism & Memory in the Balkans

January 27, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Past post-conflict justice processes in the Balkan region were comprised of a variety of protagonists, such as governments, international institutions, and civil society. Mechanisms to cope with mass atrocities committed during the conflict in the 1990s included international trials in The Hague, domestic trials in many of the former states of Yugoslavia, and several truth commission attempts. In recent years there has also been a rise in youth activism to confront war crimes.

Serbia's Challenges on Its Path to EU Accession

May 29, 2013 // 1:00pm2:00pm
Global Europe Program
Assistant Foreign Minister of Serbia Ljubica Vasic will discuss the challenges and opportunities that the Republic of Serbia faces on its path to European integration. Vasic will address key reforms that the country has introduced so far to advance its EU accession bid, and will explain why the European integration process is important for the overall development of the country. She will outline the steps that Serbia has taken to achieve one of its main foreign policy goals – EU membership.

The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees and Minorities

May 07, 2013 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Global Europe Program
What drives a state's choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this pathbreaking work on the international politics of nation-building, Harris Mylonas argues that a state's nation-building policies toward non-core groups - any aggregation of individuals perceived as an unassimilated ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state - are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups.

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