Soviet Union Events

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D-Archives: How Digitizing Declassified Documents Can Restore Ukraine’s National Memory and Build an Independent, Democratic Country

April 16, 2013 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Volodymyr Viatrovych, historian and former Director, Security Services of Ukraine Special State Archive Department, discussed how Ukraine’s future as an independent country and democratic society rests on the proposition that restoring the nation’s historical memory is a critically important precondition to overcome Ukraine’s Soviet past and to bring about national reconciliation.
Webcast

Celebrating the Legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan: The Launch of "Moynihan's Moment," a New Book by Gil Troy

April 04, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
McGill University Professor of History Gil Troy leads on expert panel on his latest book, "Moynihan's Moment: America's Fight Against Zionism as Racism" which explores the legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan.
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Russian Citizenship: From Empire to Soviet Union

March 25, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
"Russian Citizenship" is the first book to trace the Russian state’s citizenship policy throughout its history. Focusing on the period from the mid-nineteenth century to the consolidation of Stalin’s power in the 1930s, Eric Lohr considers whom the state counted among its citizens and whom it took pains to exclude. His research reveals that the Russian attitude toward citizenship was less xenophobic and isolationist and more similar to European attitudes than has been previously thought—until the drive toward autarky after 1914 eventually sealed the state off and set it apart.
Webcast

Stalin’s Decision for War in Korea

March 18, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
At the end of the 1940s Joseph Stalin was forced to negotiate a new treaty of alliance with the victorious Chinese Communists. Mao Zedong won significant concessions from Stalin. The Soviet dictator was compelled to alter completely his policy for Korea.
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Boris Rabbot and the "Shestidesiatniki:" The Forgotten Liberals of the 1960s

February 25, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Boris Rabbot, a journalist and sociologist, was in the vanguard of the pre-perestroika "shestidesiatniks," influential intellectuals and party leaders who vigorously advocated a policy of liberalization within the Soviet system. His widow, Lynn Visson, Visiting Adjunct Professor and Visiting Associate, Monterey Graduate School Institute of Translation and Interpretation, retired UN interpreter and co-compiler of "Boris Rabbot: An Unheeded Voice of the 1960s," discussed how he and the intellectuals of his generation presaged the reformers of the Gorbachev era.

Age of Delirium: The Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union

February 20, 2013 // 4:00pm6:30pm
Kennan Institute
The film, "Age of Delirium," is the story of the fall of the Soviet Union as lived and experienced by the Soviet people. The film shows what it meant to live in a state based on a utopian ideology and how truthful information led to the Soviet Union’s rapid and unstoppable collapse. The film, written and directed by David Satter in collaboration with Andrei Nekrasov, Olga Konskaya and Inara Kolmane, is based on the book of the same name by David Satter.
Webcast
Podcast

Six Months in 1945: The Origins of the Cold War

February 04, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Cold War effectively began in 1945, as soon as Americans and Russians encountered each other in the heart of Europe. But nobody, not least Stalin, wanted the Cold War.

The Limits of Detente: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1969-1973

November 08, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
In "The Limits of Detente," Craig Daigle draws on newly released documents to shed new light on how the 1973 Arab-Israeli War was the result of not only tension and competing interest between Arabs and Israelis, but also policies adopted in both Washington and Moscow. Between 1969 and 1973, the Middle East in general and the Arab-Israeli conflict in particular emerged as a crucial Cold War battleground where the limits of detente appeared in sharp relief.

Democracy Promotion in Times of Austerity: Lessons from Central and Eastern Europe

November 08, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Can the democratic transition in Central and Eastern Europe in the past twenty years be instructive? How has the current economic crisis in Europe impacted democratization on the Western Balkans? By comparing various successful approaches towards promoting democracy in the CEE region, Pavol Demes, transatlantic academy fellow at the German Marshall Fund, derives conclusions about the challenges that new democracies in the Middle East, as well as the former Soviet space may face.
Webcast

The Devil in History: Communism, Fascism, and Some Lessons of the Twentieth Century

November 06, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Reflecting Vladimir Tismaneanu's personal experiences within communist totalitarianism, "The Devil in History" is about political passions, radicalism, utopian ideals, and their catastrophic consequences in the twentieth century’s experiments in social engineering.

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