U.S. History Events

Webcast

Stalin’s Decision for War in Korea

March 18, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
At the end of the 1940s Joseph Stalin was forced to negotiate a new treaty of alliance with the victorious Chinese Communists. Mao Zedong won significant concessions from Stalin. The Soviet dictator was compelled to alter completely his policy for Korea.
Webcast

Roundtable Discussion on the Future of U.S. Global Media

February 12, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
In any given week, from North Korea to Iran and across the Middle East, from China to Afghanistan, Pakistan and Myanmar, through Africa and India to Russia, Belarus, Central Asia and Cuba, 165 million people—equivalent to more than half the U.S. population—tune into the radio and television programs of U.S. International Broadcasting (USIB) by satellite, Internet and in some cases cooperating local radio stations. After more than half a century, Congressionally-funded U.S. broadcasting remains the leading edge of American soft power—the principal means by which the United States speaks directly to less free and impoverished nations.
Webcast

The Significance of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation for America

January 28, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What were Lincoln’s motives in deciding for general emancipation? The emancipation itself changed the nature of the war. It reflected a fundamental change in Lincoln’s own thinking about the relationship of slavery to the war as well as the future place of blacks in American life.
Webcast

Women, Ecumenism, and Interracial Organizing

December 03, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Bettye Collier-Thomas explores the ways in which black and white ecumenical Protestant women grappled with issues of race and ethnicity in the early twentieth century and how in doing so they contributed to laying the groundwork for the modern civil rights movement.

Nuclear Statecraft: History and Strategy in America’s Atomic Age

November 29, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
International Security Studies
We are at a critical juncture in world politics. Nuclear strategy and policy have risen to the top of the global policy agenda, and issues ranging from a nuclear Iran to the global zero movement are generating sharp debate. The historical origins of our contemporary nuclear world are deeply consequential for contemporary policy, but it is crucial that decisions are made on the basis of fact rather than myth and misapprehension. In Nuclear Statecraft, Francis J. Gavin challenges key elements of the widely accepted narrative about the history of the atomic age and the consequences of the nuclear revolution.

Leak: How (and Why) Mark Felt Became Deep Throat

November 26, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Deep Throat, the most fabled secret source in American history, was regarded for decades as a conscientious but highly secretive whistleblower who shunned the limelight. But when the FBI’s former no. 2 executive, W. Mark Felt, came forward in 2005 to claim the mantle, questions about his true motivation began to be raised. Max Holland will discuss the Deep Throat puzzle, revealing for the first time in detail why Mark Felt leaked and his inadvertent place in history. In the process, Holland will lay bare the complex and often-problematic relationship that exists between the Washington press corps and federal officials.
Webcast

The Remarkable Past and Present Fate of UNESCO

November 19, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The United Nations Educational, Scientific, Cultural, and Communications Organization (UNESCO) grew from seeds planted during World War II and enjoyed bipartisan Congressional support as it joined the UN family in the 1940s. But controversy overtook it; the United States withdrew by 1984. It re-entered nearly twenty years later, but objecting to the agency’s 2011 vote to admit the Palestinian Authority, it began extracting itself once again. Barring a political miracle, the United States will assume observer status by this time next year. What will be the consequences?
Webcast

“Woman-Made Women: American Designers, Taste, and Mid-Century Culture”

November 07, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Global Women's Leadership Initiative
Join us for a lecture in the series "The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History" with Dr. Kathy Peiss
Webcast

Cuban Missile Crisis: Nuclear Order of Battle

October 24, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
Robert S. Norris, senior fellow for nuclear policy at the Federation of American Scientists will lead a Wilson Center panel discussion on "Cuban Missile Crisis: The Nuclear Order of Battle." Joining him will be defense analyst and nuclear historian David A. Rosenberg. The event will take place during the 50th anniversary of the 13 day crisis.

Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis

October 23, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Historian presents a panel discussion, Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Pages