United Kingdom Events

Scotland on the Eve of the Independence Referendum

September 03, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
On September 18th, Scottish voters will decide whether their country will be the first to secede from a Western-European state in recent history. After two years of campaigning it would seem that politicians, academics, and journalists would have a good understanding of the public sentiment. Using very recent data from the only large-scale, representative, and comprehensive attitudes surveys in Scotland, however, this talk will highlight where the general “wisdom” about Scots’ attitudes towards the referendum may be empirically wrong. The talk will also identify issues that may still move people, in either direction, before casting their vote.
Webcast

The End of the Union? London, Edinburgh, and the Battle for Scottish Independence

April 01, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Global Europe Program
On 18 September, Scotland will hold a referendum on its 300 year-old union with the rest of the United Kingdom. It is an historic event with the campaign battle already well under way. The Center’s Global Europe Program will convene several leading experts to discuss the referendum campaign and the wider implications of a ‘Yes’ vote for Edinburgh, London and Europe.

WordPower: Written Constitutions and British Worlds

November 18, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The proliferation of new written constitutions after 1787 presented British governments with both opportunities and challenges. By way of its empire and international heft – and increasingly in order to compete with the US – the UK came to draft and influence more constitutions in more parts of the world than any other power.
Podcast

Media Briefing: Secretary Kerry's First Interntational Trip

February 22, 2013 // 10:15am10:45am
Wilson Center experts and publications provide analysis on Secretary Kerry’s first international trip and U.S. foreign policy in a conference call with the media.

CANCELLED: Britain – the Question of Written Constitutions and the World Since 1776

February 11, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
After the American and French Revolutions, new-style written constitutions gradually came to be viewed as an essential symbol of a modern state. Britain fought against these two revolutions and has famously retained its un-codified constitution.
Webcast
Podcast

Six Months in 1945: The Origins of the Cold War

February 04, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Cold War effectively began in 1945, as soon as Americans and Russians encountered each other in the heart of Europe. But nobody, not least Stalin, wanted the Cold War.

POSTPONED--The Worlds of Joseph Conrad

October 29, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What were the historical circumstances behind Joseph Conrad's history of the fin-de-siècle as a turning point in international history? In his novels Heart of Darkness (1899), Lord Jim (1900), Nostromo (1904), and The Secret Agent (1907)--each set on a different continent, each engaging with a different imperial power, each anchored in real-world incidents and in his own personal experience--Conrad anticipated some of the defining themes of the twentieth century.
Webcast

In Search of Arctic Energy

July 12, 2012 // 9:00am12:00pm
Canada Institute
As traditional oil supplies dwindle across the globe, demand for Arctic energy will increase exponentially. In order to navigate the numerous Arctic challenges, energy companies must assess community impact, social issues, local benefits and concerns in addition to applying the latest technology to reduce the environmental risks to ensure the productive and responsible extraction of Arctic energy resources.
Duke, Arctic

Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference [Chapel Hill, NC]

March 28, 2012 // 1:45pm6:45pm
Canada Institute
The Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and Kennan Institute, with the Center for Canadian Studies at Duke University, joined UNC Chapel Hill’s Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) to host Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference on March 28, 2012 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The conference brought together policymakers, academics, students, and environmentalists to explore diverse issues related to Arctic resource and energy management from Russian, Canadian, American, and other perspectives.