United States Events

The Past and Future of the Foreign Relations Series

January 27, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In more than 450 volumes produced since its inception in 1861, the U.S. Department of State’s Foreign Relations of the United States series presents the official documentary historical record of major U.S. foreign policy decisions and significant diplomatic activity. State Department Historian Stephen P. Randolph will discuss the series’ past as well as the many challenges facing it today, not least technological developments that threaten the future of the bound volumes familiar to generations of diplomats and historians.
Webcast

The Year Ahead in Environment and Energy

January 24, 2014 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
How long will an ever-dwindling supply of coal remain the dominant source of global energy, and at what cost? How do growing water scarcity, fluctuating ecosystems, and rising oceanic acidity affect food supplies, economies, and even state stability? And how can journalists make a beat dedicated to existential crises resonate with audiences? A panel of veteran journalists offer their thoughts in a roundtable co-sponsored by the Society for Environmental Journalists.

"Pipeline Politics: A CPAC Documentary" Premiere

January 23, 2014 // 3:30pm6:00pm
Canada Institute
The Canada Institute and the Cable Public Affairs Channel (CPAC, Canada) hosted an exclusive, advanced screening of Pipeline Politics, an all-new documentary examining the people and passions that have made the proposed Keystone XL pipeline a hot-button issue in both Canada and the United States.

People Out of Place: A Constitutional History of the Long 1960s

January 13, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Vagrancy laws made it a crime to be idle and poor, or dissolute, or to wander about without any purpose. African Americans and other civil rights activists, communists, labor union activists, poor people, Beats and hippies, gay men and lesbians, women, Vietnam War protestors and student activists, and young, urban minority men all contested their constitutionality. In 1971 and 1972, the Supreme Court struck them down. Risa Goluboff shows how this changing constitutional status of vagrancy laws was part and parcel of the larger social transformations of the long 1960s.
sharyl cross

Round Table on the NATO-Russian Relationship

January 10, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
NATO’s Strategic Concept affirms the desire to build a “true strategic partnership” between NATO and Russia. While NATO and Russia have managed to cooperate in a number of practical security areas, significant strains remain in the relationship over the European institutional security configuration, missile defense, regional conflicts, and so on.
Webcast

Globalization and America's Trade Agreements

January 08, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
While the United States has benefited tremendously from trade agreements in the past, a number of political and structural challenges raise the question of whether trade will remain a key driving force for growth. Join Wilson Center senior scholar and former assistant U.S. trade representative William Krist as he discusses the TPP and the TTIP.

The Myth of Race and Its Many Political Uses, from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America

December 09, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In this presentation, Jacqueline Jones will focus upon the different uses of the myth of race in specific times and places. The life-stories of a Maryland slave murdered by his master; a fugitive in Revolutionary South Carolina; a savvy businesswoman in antebellum Providence; a principled Republican in post-Civil War Savannah; a school principal in segregationist Mississippi; and a Marxist autoworker in industrial Detroit all suggest the shifting, contradictory nature of racial mythologies from the seventeenth century to the present.

Access to Capital after the Poor People’s Campaign

November 21, 2013 // 2:30pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
As we mark the 45th Anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Poor People’s Campaign, we must consider the mixed legacy of one element of their platform, the demand that access to capital be expanded.
Webcast

New Visions for Citizen Science

November 20, 2013 // 1:00pm5:00pm
Science and Technology Innovation Program
This roundtable will connect federal agencies hoping to initiate or expand open innovation projects with leaders in citizen science, who are engaging the public participates in scientific research through lab and field work, crowdsourcing platforms, and online games. Opening remarks by Kumar Garg, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and keynote by Bob Perciasepe, EPA Deputy Administrator.

WordPower: Written Constitutions and British Worlds

November 18, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The proliferation of new written constitutions after 1787 presented British governments with both opportunities and challenges. By way of its empire and international heft – and increasingly in order to compete with the US – the UK came to draft and influence more constitutions in more parts of the world than any other power.

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