Upcoming Events

Afghanistan’s Unsung Heroes: Reflections of Afghan Women Leaders and Implications for U.S. Policy

May 27, 2015 // 2:30pm4:30pm
Asia Program
In Afghanistan, the future of women is highly uncertain. International troops have left the country, and Afghanistan’s new government is exploring the possibility of reconciliation talks with the Taliban. The new book Contested Terrain: Reflections with Afghan Women Leaders, by Sally L. Kitch, chronicles the stories of two Afghan professional women, Marzia Basel and Jamila Afghani, as they navigate both patriarchal culture and international intervention.
Webcast

Blurring Borders: National, Subnational, and Regional Orders in East Asia

June 01, 2015 // 8:30am3:30pm
Asia Program
In Japan and China, resurgent nationalism has reinforced the political importance of the region’s most powerful nation-states, fed international tensions in the region, and created additional challenges for U.S. policy.

The Second Baptism of Rus'?: The Return of Religion and the (Soviet) Origins of Russian Patriotism

June 01, 2015 // 3:30pm4:30pm
Kennan Institute
Despite the Soviet Union's commitment to atheism and secularization, religion remained a problem without a solution for most of the Soviet period--until, in 1988, it paradoxically returned to public life by invitation of the state itself. How did the regime's engagement with religion and atheism transform the Soviet Union's understanding of spiritual life? Dr. Victoria Smolkin-Rothrock will discuss how this Soviet legacy illuminates the ideological landscape of contemporary Russia.

The Economic Significance of the Nuclear Deal for Iran

June 02, 2015 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Experts agree that the signing of a comprehensive nuclear agreement and the consequent lifting of external sanctions will have a positive impact on the Iranian economy. However, the pace of sanctions relief as well as actual policies of the Iranian government will produce different results for the economic development in the country. In his presentation, Khajehpour will look at various scenarios to discuss the potential economic impact of a comprehensive nuclear deal on the Iranian economy as well as the medium-term impact of a growing Iranian economy on oil and gas markets as well as regional trade and investment.

What Russia Really Wants

June 02, 2015 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Kennan Institute
Over the past 18 months, Russia’s relations with the EU and US have deteriorated under the cloud of Western Sanctions and Russian propaganda. Dmitry Polikanov will examine developments from Moscow’s perspective and to what extent Russia differentiates between the EU and US in its policy-making decisions. Polikanov will also identify possible areas of opportunity for improving relations.

Weighing Concerns and Assurances about a Nuclear Deal with Iran

June 03, 2015 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
The Iran Project’s new report, Weighing Concerns and Assurances about a Nuclear Deal with Iran, is designed to encourage a balanced bipartisan discussion on emerging arguments for and against a P5+1 deal with Iran on its nuclear program.

Governing the Ungovernable: Frontier Rule along the Afghanistan-Pakistan Border and Beyond

June 03, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Asia Program
The Afghanistan-Pakistan border region is a large, ungoverned space and a constant source of instability. Both countries have long grappled with the question of how to rule this rugged frontier, which many regard as ungovernable. This talk examines the evolution of frontier rule in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region, and how similar models of governance have been applied as far afield as Kenya, Nigeria, Argentina, and even the United States.
Webcast

Global Trends in the Next Decade: Implications for U.S. National Security, Diplomacy, and Development

June 04, 2015 // 10:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Global trends, including climate change, population dynamics, water and energy scarcities, and a shifting economic landscape, are shaping the future of U.S. national security, diplomacy, and development policy. Please join us as we think about how to respond and what will influence international policy in the years to come.
Webcast

Economics and Transparency: Meeting the Challenge in the Americas

June 09, 2015 // 1:30pm5:00pm
Throughout much of Latin America, the "golden years" of economic growth during the last decade's commodity boom have given way to economic decline or stagnation. At the same time, a mobilized citizenry is demanding better government performance. These two factors have focused unprecedented attention on rule of law deficits and official corruption. Meanwhile, relations among countries of the hemisphere have grown more complex. As much as the region has welcomed the normalization of U.S.-Cuban relations, the options for international insertion now extend far beyond the Western Hemisphere.

Leitmotiv in Russian Novels of the 19th and 20th Centuries

June 11, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Very few readers notice that the general plot structure of three of the greatest Russian novels of the 20th century – Doctor Zhivago, And Quiet Flows the Don, and Lolita – is the same, because the authors have unwittingly described the same situation. Each story features main heroines, symbolizing Russia, who are defiled by their fathers (or step-fathers) and then run away with lovers and bear dead children. Incest becomes a metaphor of power that depraves the country through criminal methods of governing. In Nabokov's case, the topic of defilement and forbidden passion is always connected with the threat of prison (Invitation to a Beheading, Bend Sinister, preface to Lolita, and Lolita itself: in attempting to become free from obsessive desire, the hero falls deeper and deeper into an abyss of dependence and fear. It is the best metaphor for the 1917 revolution which only deteriorated the conditions of Russian life). Meanwhile, the main hero hopes that the fulfillment of sinful wish would cure him, but it is a great delusion both in moral and social terms. This plot line first appeared in Tolstoy's novel, The Resurrection, which in essence predicted Russian history for more than 100 years.

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To Attend an Event

Unless otherwise noted:

Meetings listed on this page are free and open to the public. Reservations are not required unless otherwise noted. All meetings take place at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC. Please see map and directions. Allow time for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required for entry.

To confirm time and place, contact Maria-Stella Gatzoulis on the day of the event: tel. (202) 691-4188. Check this page for the latest updates and notices.