New Governments and Leaders

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New Governments and Leaders:

Tunisia's Jebali on Traumas of Transition

June 19, 2013
Hamadi Jebali was Tunisia’s first prime minister after the 2011 Jasmine Revolution. Often compared to Nelson Mandela, he spent 17 years in prison for his involvement with the Islamist Ennahda movement. Jebali reflects on post-revolution achievements and failures and future challenges in two interviews and a public appearance....
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Turmoil in Tunisia Two Years Later

Jan 16, 2013
The second anniversary of Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution reflected the deepening political divisions across the North African country. Five different political factions—two Islamist and three secular parties—took to the street of Tunis on January 14 to mark the ouster of former President Zine al Abidine Ben Ali. They had starkly different messages...
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Egypt: Interview with Mohamed Morsi

Jan 14, 2013
In an interview with CNN, Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi called for Syrian President Bashar Assad to be tried for war crimes at the International Criminal Court. Morsi also pledged to respect Egypt’s treaty with Israel while supporting Palestinian efforts to attain “their full-fledged rights...
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English Translation of the Tunisian Draft Constitution

Jan 3, 2013
The Tunisian National Constituent Assembly issued a draft constitution on Dec. 14, 2012. Civil society representatives in six of Tunisia's 24 governorates met with assembly members to discuss the text later that month. The National Constituent Assembly launched the initiative with the United Nations to "enhance citizens' participation in the debate." The following is a non-official English translation of the draft constitution by the United Nations Development Programme project in Tunisia...
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Egypt’s Draft Constitution

Dec 3, 2012
Egypt’s Constituent Assembly passed a draft constitution on November 30. President Mohamed Morsi then announced a national referendum will be held on December 15. “I renew my call for opening a serious national dialogue over the concerns of the nation, with all honesty and impartiality, to end the transitional period as soon as possible, in a way that guarantees the newly-born democracy,” Morsi told the Constituent Assembly....
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Tunisia: Interview with Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi

Nov 2, 2012
Tunisia -- Robin Wright interviewed Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi, the leader of Ennahda Party, on the first anniversary of Tunisia’s first democratic elections. Ghannouchi reflected on the new Islamist spectrum, especially concern about the growing Salafi factor....
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Part I: Governments on Anti-Islam Film

Sep 28, 2012
The leaders of Islamist governments in Egypt, Libya and Tunisia have condemned attacks on U.S. embassies and consulates in reaction to the offensive “Innocence of Muslims” film. In public statements and private contacts with American officials, all three leaders assured the United States that the assaults did not reflect government policy or public opinion among the majority in their countries. Each of them blamed small groups of extremists...
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In Their Own Words: Mohamed Morsi

Sep 07, 2012
In just ten weeks, President Mohamed Morsi has gone from political unknown to one of the most powerful leaders in the Middle East. The U.S.-educated engineer—a former parliament member and a former member of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Guidance Council—is proving to be both unpredictable and politically savvy...
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President-elect Mohamed Morsi’s first speech

June 26, 2012
The following are translated excerpts from Morsi’s acceptance speech in Arabic on June 24, 2012:
In the name of God, the most compassionate, the most merciful. Thanks be to Allah, prayers and peace be upon the messenger of Allah...
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Overview

The Islamists Are Coming is the first book to survey the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab Spring.  Often lumped together, the more than 50 Islamist parties with millions of followers now constitute a whole new spectrum—separate from either militants or secular parties.  They will shape the new order in the world’s most volatile region more than any other political bloc. Yet they have diverse goals and different constituencies. Sometimes they are even rivals.

The Islamists Are Coming

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