Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding News

New HAPP Occasional Paper: A 21st Century Vision for U.S. Global Media

Nov 15, 2012
The Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program is pleased to announce the publication of an Occasional Paper, “A 21st Century Vision for U.S. Global Media,” by Wilson Center Senior Scholar A. Ross Johnson and R. Eugene Parta.

Interview between Efraim Halevy and Aaron David Miller

Oct 24, 2012
Efraim Halevy is a former Director of Mossad and former Head of the Israeli National Security Council. Aaron David Miller is the Vice President for New Initiatives at the Woodrow Wilson Center. The interview took place following the October 18 meeting “Iran, Palestine, and the Arab Spring: The View from Israel” at the Wilson Center.

Obama, Romney Debate U.S. Policy in the Middle East

Oct 23, 2012
U.S. policy in the Middle East was a central point of dispute during the final presidential debate on October 22. President Barack Obama claimed that he has shown strong leadership on counterterrorism, democracy, women’s rights and religious minorities. During the debate, he labeled Romney’s proposed policies “reckless” and “all over the map.” Governor Romney criticized Obama for not stemming the “rising tide of chaos” in the region. He called for arming the “responsible parties” of Syrian insurgents in order to force President Bashar Assad out. Both candidates emphasized economic development as the key to stability and peace in the region.

Petro Politics: Mixing Oil and War

Oct 23, 2012
In many countries, oil tends to fuel civil and international conflicts. Wilson Center Fellow Jeff Colgan talks about the case studies to be featured in his forthcoming book due out in February 2013.

Clinton Pledges Increased Support for Democratic Transitions

Oct 16, 2012
On October 12, Secretary of State Hilary Clinton declared that U.S. support for democratic transitions is a “strategic necessity” and not just “a matter of idealism.” She discussed the status of North African political transitions at a conference hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Clinton pledged to increase engagement with the region, despite the outbreak of anti-American sentiment in September 2012. She urged Congress to approve an additional $770 million in assistance to countries that enact political and economic reforms.

Regulating the Resource Curse

Oct 15, 2012
This summer, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission adopted new regulations requiring oil, gas, and mineral companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges to report payments to foreign governments. The aim of the effort is to reduce the kind of corruption and insecurity seen in places like Angola, Nigeria, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – sometimes called the “resource curse.” But, argues Wilson Center scholar Jeff Colgan, it may also help reduce international conflict between more developed countries as well.

Part II: Religious Leaders on Anti-Islam Film

Sep 28, 2012
On Sept. 9, the Salafi preacher and television host Sheikh Khalid Abdullah aired a YouTube clip of the "Innocence of Muslims" film on satellite channel al Nas. Religious leaders across the region condemned the film's offensive content. High-ranking clerics in Saudi Arabia, Egypt and elsewhere called for restraint after the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya on Sept. 11.

Part I: Governments on Anti-Islam Film

Sep 28, 2012
The leaders of Islamist governments in Egypt, Libya and Tunisia have condemned attacks on U.S. embassies and consulates in reaction to the offensive “Innocence of Muslims” film. In public statements and private contacts with American officials, all three leaders assured the United States that the assaults did not reflect government policy or public opinion among the majority in their countries. Each of them blamed small groups of extremists.

Gallup: Libyans Want Militias Disarmed Immediately

Sep 14, 2012
On Sept. 13, Gallup released a poll showing that 95 percent of surveyed Libyans want militias to turn in their weapons immediately. Gallup conducted more than 1000 face-to-face interviews with adults during March and April 2012.

Thoughts on Strategy from a Career Ambassador

Sep 05, 2012
Both Washington and Beijing consider good bilateral relations of vital importance. But their growing strategic rivalry has the potential to evolve into mutual antagonism. The hard reality is that China and the United States will not be able to lessen strategic mistrust unless and until they are prepared to address a central question: is there an array of military deployments and normal operations that will permit China to defend its core interests while allowing America to continue fully to meet its defense responsibilities in the region and protect vital U.S. interests?

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