Egypt News

Morsi: On Anniversary and Protests

Jun 27, 2013
Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi marked one year in office by admitting that he had made mistakes and promised “radical and quick reforms” for state institutions. But in his televised June 27 address to the nation, Morsi also accused regime remnants of instigating anti-government violence. He blamed unnamed “enemies of Egypt” for sabotaging democracy.

Scorecard: Islamist Successes and Failures

Jun 25, 2013
Islamists have won unprecedented political power In the Middle East since the 2011 uprisings, notably in Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco. Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi marks his first year in office on June 30, 2013. Nathan Brown analyzes the Islamist scorecard. “Despite electoral victories, Islamists have not yet figured out how to wield political power,” he concludes.

Morsi Meter: 9,427 protests and counting one year later

Jun 25, 2013
Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi marks one-year in power on June 30, 2013. It has been a contentious year fraught with growing troubles—and many protests. The opposition is calling for the biggest demonstrations since the 2011 uprising on the anniversary. The following run-down of Egypt’s top ten problems helps explain growing public frustration and rage.

Women on Syria Part I: Greatest Fears

Jun 24, 2013
In June 2013, the death toll in Syria reportedly rose to more than 100,000. The conflict began with non-violent protests in March 2011, but quickly turned violent after harsh regime crackdowns. Twelve women from seven Arab countries, from Bahrain to Egypt and Syria, were asked what they feared most about the conflict.

Women on Syria Part II: After Assad

Jun 24, 2013
The endgame in Syria is not clear after two years of intense fighting between the rebels and government forces. But the Syrian opposition has made it clear that President Bashar Assad leave the country. Twelve women from seven Arab countries, from Bahrain to Egypt and Syria, were asked what a post-Assad Syria would be like.

Top Egyptian Cleric Tackles Extremism

Jun 19, 2013
Grand Mufti Mohammed Ali Goma’a has warned that the rising tide of sectarianism threatens to tear Egyptian society apart. Egypt’s highest authority on Islamic law has argued that religious leaders have a responsibility to challenge extremist narratives. He discussed challenges to Christian-Muslim relations with Bishop Mouneer Hanna Anis, the Anglican bishop of Egypt and North Africa, at a June 14 event hosted by the United States of Peace.
Egypt's first Islamist president Mohamed Mursi attends during his meeting with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu at the presidential palace in Cairo July 2, 2012. Egypt will approach the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and other financial institutions to help get its economy back on track once Mursi appoints a government, one of his financial advisers told Reuters.

Egypt's Fundamental Crisis of Legitimacy

Jun 06, 2013
Wilson Center Senior Scholar Marina Ottaway discussed the legitimacy of the outcome of Egypt's recent elections and the validity of the country's new constitution in a June 6, 2013 National Interest article.

The Woodrow Wilson Center Announces 2013 – 2014 Fellowship Class

May 30, 2013
Jane Harman, director, president & CEO of the Wilson Center, is pleased to announce the members of the 2013-2014 fellowship class. The 21 fellows, most of whom are expected to start September 2013, include scholars and practitioners from the United States, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, the Netherlands, and New Zealand.

U.S. Report on Religious Freedom in Middle East

May 20, 2013
Blasphemy and apostasy laws were applied in a discriminatory manner in several Middle Eastern and North African countries in 2012, according to a new report by the U.S. State Department. “These laws are frequently used to repress dissent, to harass political opponents, and to settle personal vendettas,” Secretary of State Kerry said on May 20.

Pew: Egyptians Favor Major Role for Islam in Politics

May 16, 2013
At least 60 percent of Egyptians prefer democracy to any other kind of government, according to new poll by the Pew Research Global Attitudes Project. Results suggest that Egyptians want Islam to play a major role in their democracy. About 58 percent of Egyptians say laws should strictly follow Koranic teachings while 28 percent contend that laws should reflect Islamic values and principles ― but not strictly follow the Koran. Only 11 percent do not think the Quran should influence national laws.

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