International Security News

Latin American Program in the News: Guatemala: capturan presunto jefe narco buscado en EEUU

Apr 06, 2012
On Tuesday Authorities captured alleged drug lord Guatemalan Horst Walther Overdick. “His capture is certainly a welcome development, but its impact on drug trafficking in Guatemala or levels of violence overall remains to be seen. In Mexico, the strategy of going after drug kingpins has been one of the factors contributing to the rise in violence,” Director of the Latin America Program Cynthia Arnson told the Associated press. [Original Article in Spanish]

Political Demography at the Monterey Institute of International Studies

Apr 05, 2012
Jack Goldstone, Richard Cincotta, Jennifer Sciubba, and Geoff Dabelko spoke at the Monterey Institute for International Studies on key developments in political demography.

Latin American Program in the News: Caracas: “A War Zone”

Apr 03, 2012
“Caracas is the most dangerous capital city in the world, more dangerous than Baghdad,” says Fellow Roberto Briceño Leon, who heads the Observatorio Venezolano de Violencia, a non-government watchdog that monitors crime in the country… Crime has also become more organized and lethal, Briceño Leon says. Chavez’s policies have also facilitated the increase. The president has taken over a number of local police forces, while weakening state governments, especially those whose leaders belong to the opposition.
How Russia Can Ease Assad Out

How Russia Can Ease Assad Out

Mar 31, 2012
By negotiating Assad's exit from Syria, Moscow could help to end the violence and bloodshed, and "reset" world perceptions of Russia, writes Wilson Center President Jane Harman in The Washington Post.

Four Takeaways from the Global Water Security Intelligence Assessment

Mar 27, 2012
The just-released unclassified National Intelligence Council report on water and security is a positive contribution to understanding these complex and interconnected ecological, social, economic, and political issues around water.
National Security

New Laws Needed to Fight Terror

Mar 27, 2012
Amid unprecedented security concerns, bright legal lines are needed for aggressive intelligence-gathering and to guard privacy rights, Wilson Center President Jane Harman writes in Foreign Policy.

Latin American Program in the News: Death of Consul's Daughter Spurs Venezuela Outcry

Mar 20, 2012
Latin American Program Scholar, Roberto Briceño-Leon, comments on high murder rates in Venezuela.

Geoff Dabelko on Finding Common Ground Among Conservation, Development, and Security at the 2011 WWF Fuller Symposium

Mar 15, 2012
Bridging the divide between the conservation and security communities “requires that we check some stereotypes at the door,” said ECSP’s Geoff Dabelko at the World Wildlife Fund’s Conservation Forward: Ideas That Work and How Science Can Effect Change symposium.

NPIHP Senior Advisor Reviews Philip Taubman's "The Partnership" in Washington Post

Mar 06, 2012
NPIHP Senior Advisor Martin J. Sherwin reviews Philip Taubman's "The Partnership: Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb" in the Washington Post.

India and the US Pivot to Asia

Mar 06, 2012
The US strategic plan is to continue providing global security with emphasis on “rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region.” Such a pivot is not new, but has been in play since the end of the Cold War, argues Robert M. Hathaway, director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The strategy requires a long-term partnership with India, as an economic and security anchor in the region. Priorities for both countries vary, particularly in regard to China, leading to divisions within each country as well. Many in India do not want their nation to take part in any Sino-American cold war or conflict and accuse the US of ignoring shenanigans from Pakistan. Indians are also wary about US plans to withdraw troops from Afghanistan and the likely resulting chaos. Both countries have conservatives who oppose reliance on partnerships and agreements that could constrain their military. Ultimately, Hathaway concludes, strength of nations as global actors depends on ensuring economic security and meeting domestic challenges. – YaleGlobal

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