Middle East and North Africa News

Jalili Nuclear Talks

Is a Diplomatic Breakthrough Possible in Baghdad?

May 23, 2012
With the threat of further sanctions looming, Iran may be more inclined to halt uranium-enrichment efforts, and this week’s meetings on the country’s nuclear program is less tense than past talks. Still, plenty of obstacles lie on the road to an agreement, not least of which is US domestic politics this election year. Wilson Center expert Michael Adler analyzes the situation.
The Islamists are Coming CONTEXT

The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are

May 17, 2012
Greater political pluralism in Tunisia, Egypt, and other countries of the region could augur less dependency on the US and a more independent foreign policy, Wilson Center expert Samer Shehata says. In this interview, Shehata and Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright analyze the Middle East’s evolving political landscape.

Foreign Relations of the United States, 1969–1976, Volume XVI, Soviet Union August 1974–December 1976

May 16, 2012
This volume, the final of five covering relations between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Nixon-Ford administrations, presents documentation on how matters as diverse as strategic arms limitation, European security, the Middle East, Jewish emigration, and Angola intersected to influence the course of Soviet-American relations during the presidency of Gerald R. Ford.

Tunisia’s Islamists Struggle to Rule

May 15, 2012
In stark contrast to Islamist victories elsewhere, Algeria’s election on May 10 produced a “crushing defeat” of two moderate Islamist parties, reports David Ottaway in a new analysis from Algiers. The outcome defied public predictions by Islamist politicians that they would win at least a plurality of seats—and potentially even enough to lead a new government. Two secular parties aligned with the former government instead increased their dominance in the National People’s Assembly, winning 288 seats – or 62 percent of the vote. The moderate Islamists have instead been marginalized politically—a position that may undermine prospects of cooperation with the new government.

"Algeria’s Islamists Crushed in First Arab Spring Elections" by David B. Ottaway

May 15, 2012
David B. Ottaway is a senior scholar at the Wilson Center who has recently returned from Algeria. The following piece is an overview of his observations of Algeria’s May 10 parliamentary elections.

Nabeel Rajab's Arrest Featured in Newsletter of the World Movement for Democracy

May 09, 2012
The recent arrest of Nabeel Rajab, Bahraini human rights activist and recipient of the 2011 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award, has drawn world-wide media attention. Human rights organizations have issued statements in support of releasing the activist, as media networks reported on the arrest.

HAPP Partners Author Article in Diplomatic History

May 02, 2012
David Palkki and Hal Brands publish "'Conspiring Bastards': Saddam Hussein's Strategic View of the United States" in Diplomatic History.

"Fostering the Next Generation" Keynote Address by Moushira Khattab

May 01, 2012
The following is the text of the keynote address by Public Policy Scholar Moushira Khattab at the Centre for Development and Population Activities conference co-sponsored by the Middle East Program, “Fostering the Next Generation: Evolving Models of Women’s Leadership in the Middle East” held on April 18, 2012 at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

Robin Wright’s book Rock the Casbah wins OPC Award

Apr 24, 2012
USIP-Wilson Center Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright’s book Rock the Casbah has won the Cornelius Ryan Award for best non-fiction book on international affairs.

Iran’s Tone Changes in Istanbul: Nuke Talks ‘Constructive and Useful’

Apr 15, 2012
While Iran’s nuke talks in Istanbul were ‘constructive and useful,’ the real work is yet to come writes Public Policy Scholar Michael Adler in this follow-up report on the P5+1 talks in Istanbul.

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