North America News

Do Friends Spy on Friends? What We Have Learned From the “Summer of Snowden”

Nov 20, 2013
Tension is high between the U.S. and its European allies over revelations about NSA spying. Georg Mascolo, former Editor-in-Chief of the German news weekly Der Spiegel recently met with Edward Snowden and has co-authored an article about the need to rebuild trust between allies. In this interview he summarizes what we have learned from the "Summer of Snowden."

The Military's Invaluable 'Soft' Power

Nov 19, 2013
"At a time when too many see U.S. foreign policy in kinetic terms, like drones or special ops, the 'soft power diplomacy' of disaster relief delivers life-saving help to desperate people, and improves their image of America," writes Jane Harman in The Huffington Post.

Inventory Finds Increase in Consumer Products Containing Nanoscale Materials

Oct 28, 2013
The updated Nanotechnology Consumer Products Inventory now contains 1,628 consumer products that have been introduced to the market since 2005, representing a 24 percent increase since the last update in 2010. In addition to finding new products introduced to the market, the newly re-launched inventory seeks to address scientific uncertainty with contributions from those involved with nanomaterials production, use, and analysis.

Lessons from the Summer of Snowden

Oct 22, 2013
“Lessons from the Summer of Snowden: The Hard Road Back to Trust,” a joint policy paper by former Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Georg Mascolo, and Ben Scott, Senior Advisor at the New America Foundation, discusses the necessity of a political solution that resolves US and European disputes over NSA surveillance programs.

The Carbon Tax: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

Sep 25, 2013
Canada Institute Contributor Omer Aziz discusses the future of Canadian and American energy and what that means for both countries efforts to curb carbon pollution.

The Tally

Sep 20, 2013
The Syrians created a crisis by using chemical weapons in a massive attack on August 21, President Barack Obama threatened force but then vacillated, and Russian President Vladimir Putin, recognizing both Obama's strengths and his weaknesses, stepped up, grabbed center stage, and inserted himself directly into a process he'd long avoided. It shows that the right combination of pain and gain is what creates openings and drives big decisions.

Why Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion in Europe is in the U.S. Interest

Aug 05, 2013
“Why Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion in Europe is in the U.S. Interest,” a Wilson Center policy brief by former Public Policy Scholar Spencer P. Boyer, demonstrates the relevance of diversity politics in Europe and its importance to the transatlantic relationship.

Current Immigration and Integration Debates in Germany and the United States: What We Can Learn from Each Other

Aug 05, 2013
Former Public Policy Scholar Spencer P. Boyer compares immigration and integration debates in Germany and the United States in a policy paper co-authored with Victoria Pardini.

Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Investigates China's Water Challenge

Jul 24, 2013
Dr. Elizabeth Economy from Council on Foreign Relations testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs and talked about China's water challenge and its implications for the U.S. rebalance to Asia.

Tipping the Scales: Can TTIP Jump Start the Global Economy?

Jul 10, 2013
With a still sluggish and struggling global economy, many economists believe that a successfully negotiated trade agreement between the U.S. and E.U. could provide the kind of jolt that many markets need. With negotiations over the proposed Transatlantic Trade Investment Partnership (TTIP) about to heat up, Kent Hughes provides context on what could be a game changing agreement.

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