Russia and Eurasia News

Next: Russia Unplugged

Dec 11, 2014
To stay in power, "Putin and his minions feel they must corral and tame the Internet," warns Fellow Maxim Trudolyubov.

Ukraine's China Problem

Dec 08, 2014
China is popularly viewed as the winner in Russia’s clash with the West over Ukraine. But this conflict does not leave Beijing unscathed, especially when it comes to the country’s own defense modernization plans and future security cooperation with Russia, writes Michael Kofman.
Webcast

From the Velvet Revolution to Putin’s Russia: Is the Need for “Free Media” Greater Than Ever?

Nov 14, 2014
A. Ross Johnson and Nenad Pejic reflect on the decline of independent media and the attempt to fill the information deficit in nations across the globe. What Cold War lessons resonate today and what are the demands of the new media environment? And is the U.S. doing enough to bring objective information to authoritarian countries and unfree societies?

Is Russia planning a winter offensive?

Nov 13, 2014
"The invasion of Ukraine and confrontation with the West have whipped up nationalist sentiment, but Russia has run out of foreign policy victories to feed to the fire," writes Michael Kofman.
Webcast

Ukraine’s Election Delivers a New Generation of Leadership

Oct 30, 2014
In an exclusive interview, newly elected member of the Ukrainian Parliament, Hanna Hopko, shares her thoughts on post-election voter expectations and the challenges she and her party faces. Her party, the Samopomich (“Self-Reliance”) Party, polled at less than 5% before the election. But after the votes were counted, Samopomich is the third largest party in Verkhovna Rada (Parliament) of Ukraine.

Why Sending Weapons to Ukraine Would be a Terrible Idea for the US

Oct 27, 2014
"The Ukraine Freedom Support Act grants permission to send Ukraine a variety of weapons, ammunition, and specialized equipment to fill gaps in its current military’s capabilities. But it completely misunderstands what Ukraine needs. And if the US goes down this road, it will be sleepwalking into a proxy conflict with Russia," writes Michael Kofman.
Webcast

Is Democracy Failing?

Oct 23, 2014
In the United States alone, ongoing partisan battles have raised questions about the ability of the often self-proclaimed “world’s greatest democracy” to meet its most basic obligations. Have these failures, real and perceived, damaged the ability of democracies around the world to promote democratic governance as the solution to a wide range of challenges and problems?
Webcast

Putin’s Kleptocracy: Who Owns Russia?

Oct 23, 2014
Tales of corruption in Russia are nothing new. But in her new book, “Putin’s Kleptocracy,” Karen Dawisha connects the dots between government and private sector corruption and Vladimir Putin’s rapid rise to power, leading to the question, who owns Russia? That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

Former Kennan Scholar wins the American Historical Association's Albert J. Beveridge Award

Oct 23, 2014
Kate Brown, 2007 Kennan Institute Research Scholar, was recently awarded the 2014 Albert J. Beveridge Award for her book, Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters, which provides an account of the first two cities to produce plutonium, Richland, Washington and Ozersk, Russia, and how these idealistic communities helped conceal the fallout from the nuclear programs.

Can Oil Sanctions Push Russian Economy Into Recession?

Oct 22, 2014
"It [Russia] is facing a lower price for oil. It is confronting a rising Ruble. In a diverse economy, you could take advantage of such circumstances, but Russia doesn't have a diverse economy and it won't be able to," says Will Pomeranz.

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