Syria News

After the Arab Spring

Dec 14, 2012
"On the second anniversary of the Arab uprisings, millions across the Middle East still have dreams of makeovers. But revolutionary fairy tales have devolved into the reality of running countries that are still without fully functioning governments or basic laws. Providing fundamental public services, much less addressing economic woes that sparked the uprisings, is still a very long way off," writes DIstinguished Scholar Robin Wright.

U.S. Policy on Second Anniversary of Arab Uprisings

Dec 13, 2012
On December 13, Deputy Secretary of State William J. Burns outlined U.S. policy in the Middle East two years after the Arab uprisings. Burns committed support for continued democratic changes and urged tolerance despite the turmoil. He emphasized the need for “sustainable democracy,” and not just stability. Burns also noted that the United States’ democratic transition “took fifteen years to deliver a President, Congress and Constitution—and even then it required ten amendments to pass and a civil war to realize its potential.” The war ended nearly 90 years after declaring independence from Great Britain.

Women after the Arab Awakening

Dec 11, 2012
Women played frontline roles in the Arab uprisings, but have since faced growing political hurdles during the transitions. Nine female activists from Yemen, Egypt, Tunisia, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Libya outlined the specific challenges to women’s participation at a meeting sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in October 2012. They also offered strategies for empowering women.

Turkey’s Popularity Slips in Mideast

Nov 05, 2012
Turkey’s standing in the Arab world and Iran has dropped noticeably over the past year according to a new poll by the Turkish Economic and Social Studies Foundation (TESEV). In 2011, 78 percent of the 2,800 respondents had a positive view of Turkey. In 2012, it dropped to 69 percent. “Most of the participants think Turkey is the strongest political power in the region. They consider Saudi Arabia the strongest economic power and Iran the strongest military power,” said TESEV Foreign Policy Chairman Mensur Akgun at an Istanbul press conference.

Tunisia: Interview with Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi

Nov 02, 2012
Tunisia -- Robin Wright interviewed Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi, the leader of Ennahda Party, on the first anniversary of Tunisia’s first democratic elections. Ghannouchi reflected on the new Islamist spectrum, especially concern about the growing Salafi factor.

Obama, Romney Debate U.S. Policy in the Middle East

Oct 23, 2012
U.S. policy in the Middle East was a central point of dispute during the final presidential debate on October 22. President Barack Obama claimed that he has shown strong leadership on counterterrorism, democracy, women’s rights and religious minorities. During the debate, he labeled Romney’s proposed policies “reckless” and “all over the map.” Governor Romney criticized Obama for not stemming the “rising tide of chaos” in the region. He called for arming the “responsible parties” of Syrian insurgents in order to force President Bashar Assad out. Both candidates emphasized economic development as the key to stability and peace in the region.

U.S. Sanctions Hizballah for Syria Support

Aug 10, 2012
On August 10, the Treasury Department sanctioned Hizballah for supporting the Syrian government on the basis of Executive Order 13582. “This action highlights Hizballah’s activities within Syria and its integral role in the continued violence the Assad regime is inflicting on the Syrian population,” the Treasury Department said in its formal announcement.
A demonstrator punches through a portrait of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad during a protest outside the Syrian Embassy in London

The Winners and Losers of Syria's Civil War

Aug 09, 2012
Looking ahead to a post-Assad Syria, Aaron David Miller provides a preliminary scorecard of who the winners and losers will be, both within the splintered nation and among foreign stakeholders Russia, Iran, Israel, Lebanon, and the United States.
Free Syrian Army members tear a banner with picture of Syria's President Al Assad at Syrian border crossing building between Syria and Turkey at Jarablus

Why Syria's Rebels Can't Have it All

Aug 06, 2012
The reasons to intervene in Syria are just not compelling enough to offset the risks and the unknowns. For the United States to enter the fray as a quasi-combatant would make matters more complicated, not less, writes Aaron David Miller in Foreign Policy.

Jane Harman on the Role of the State Department

Jul 26, 2012
Jane Harman discusses the role of the State Department as well as a way forward for Syria in this interview with CNN.

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