U.S. Foreign Policy News

Foreign scholars look at the U.S. election

Nov 13, 2012
Fazley Siddiq, Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Canada-U.S. Relations, and Barbara Falk, Wilson Center public policy scholar, and former Wilson Center public policy scholar Pierre Martin, provide insight and analysis on the U.S. presidential election.

Tunisia: Interview with Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi

Nov 02, 2012
Tunisia -- Robin Wright interviewed Sheikh Rachid Ghannouchi, the leader of Ennahda Party, on the first anniversary of Tunisia’s first democratic elections. Ghannouchi reflected on the new Islamist spectrum, especially concern about the growing Salafi factor.

U.S. State Department Assists Arab Economies

Nov 01, 2012
On October 26, the Assistant Secretary for the U.S. State Department Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs pledged to “create more links between the new [Arab] democracies and American industry.” Assistant Secretary Jose Fernandez briefed the 21st Annual Arab-U.S. Policymakers Conference on successful economic development projects enacted since the Arab uprisings.

Official Ottawa closely watching U.S. presidential, congressional races


Oct 31, 2012
The U.S. election will be held on Nov. 6 and here in Ottawa, top political and government players behind the scenes are sure to have been kept up to date on presidential and congressional races by Canada’s U.S. Embassy since last year, said former Canadian diplomat Paul Frazer who served as minister of the Canadian Embassy in Washington throughout the Clinton administration.

On The Brink Part 2: The Cuban Missile Crisis 50 Years Later

Oct 26, 2012
New research is shedding additional light on the Cold War's iconic nuclear standoff between the US and USSR, with the tiny nation of Cuba in the middle. For the next two weeks, CONTEXT will look back on what we're learning with an eye toward the lessons that apply today. In part 2 of our "On The Brink" series, Philip Brenner describes how and why the missiles were brought to Cuba and what might have happened if they'd stayed.

On The Brink Part 3: The Cuban Missile Crisis 50 Years Later

Oct 26, 2012
New research is shedding additional historical light on the Cold War's iconic nuclear standoff between the U.S. and U.S.S.R., with the tiny nation of Cuba in the middle. For the next two weeks, CONTEXT will look back on what we're learning with an eye toward the lessons that apply today. In part 3 of our "On The Brink" series, Svetlana Savranskaya describes the underrated role of Russia's Anastas Mikoyan in events that ultimately avoided nuclear catastrophe.

Obama, Romney Debate U.S. Policy in the Middle East

Oct 23, 2012
U.S. policy in the Middle East was a central point of dispute during the final presidential debate on October 22. President Barack Obama claimed that he has shown strong leadership on counterterrorism, democracy, women’s rights and religious minorities. During the debate, he labeled Romney’s proposed policies “reckless” and “all over the map.” Governor Romney criticized Obama for not stemming the “rising tide of chaos” in the region. He called for arming the “responsible parties” of Syrian insurgents in order to force President Bashar Assad out. Both candidates emphasized economic development as the key to stability and peace in the region.

Rand: U.S. Engagement with Muslim Brotherhood Youth

Oct 22, 2012
In October 2012, a new Rand Corporation report highlighted divisions between Muslim Brotherhood youth and senior leadership in Egypt. Younger members are usually more progressive on social issues like gender equality and minority rights. They are also frustrated by the organization’s internal hierarchy, which provides them with limited leadership roles or responsibility. The report warns that U.S. officials are not doing enough to engage with emerging leaders at the grassroots level.

Pew: U.S. Voter Pessimism on New Middle East

Oct 22, 2012
The Pew Research Center conducted a poll on the U.S. public‘s views on the Middle East in early October. The public is increasingly pessimistic about regional developments following the Arab uprisings. In April 2011, 42 percent of Americans thought changes in leadership would “lead to lasting improvements for people” in countries like Egypt and Libya. But in October 2012, only 25 percent still believe there will be lasting improvements.The results were released prior to the final presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Overall the poll found little difference in opinion between Republicans, Democrats and Independents. The majority of Americans, 54 percent, say it is “more important to have stable governments in the Middle East, even if there is less democracy in the region.”

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