U.S. National Security News

2012’s Top 'New Security Beat' Posts

Jan 03, 2013
If 2011 was the year of political demography, then 2012 was perhaps when the full intersection of natural resource management, population dynamics, development, and security came into focus.

Summer Institute on the International History of Nuclear Weapons

Dec 20, 2012
The sixth annual Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations’ (SHAFR) Summer Institute, hosted by the History and Public Policy Program’s Nuclear Proliferation International History Project (NPIHP).

New HAPP Occasional Paper: A 21st Century Vision for U.S. Global Media

Nov 15, 2012
The Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program is pleased to announce the publication of an Occasional Paper, “A 21st Century Vision for U.S. Global Media,” by Wilson Center Senior Scholar A. Ross Johnson and R. Eugene Parta.

Should Lawmakers and White House Have Been Warned of Petraeus Investigation?

Nov 15, 2012
When the Petraeus news hit, congressional leaders bemoaned not being notified beforehand. Gwen Ifill talks to Wilson Center President and former ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee Jane Harman and former Justice Department official Matthew Miller about when and if Congress and the president should be briefed on such investigations.

Is the Petraeus Scandal about National Security?

Nov 15, 2012
Jane Harman talks to CNN's Wolf Blitzer about the departure of David Petraeus as CIA Director.

Interview between Efraim Halevy and Aaron David Miller

Oct 24, 2012
Efraim Halevy is a former Director of Mossad and former Head of the Israeli National Security Council. Aaron David Miller is the Vice President for New Initiatives at the Woodrow Wilson Center. The interview took place following the October 18 meeting “Iran, Palestine, and the Arab Spring: The View from Israel” at the Wilson Center.

Obama, Romney Debate U.S. Policy in the Middle East

Oct 23, 2012
U.S. policy in the Middle East was a central point of dispute during the final presidential debate on October 22. President Barack Obama claimed that he has shown strong leadership on counterterrorism, democracy, women’s rights and religious minorities. During the debate, he labeled Romney’s proposed policies “reckless” and “all over the map.” Governor Romney criticized Obama for not stemming the “rising tide of chaos” in the region. He called for arming the “responsible parties” of Syrian insurgents in order to force President Bashar Assad out. Both candidates emphasized economic development as the key to stability and peace in the region.

Pew: U.S. Voter Pessimism on New Middle East

Oct 22, 2012
The Pew Research Center conducted a poll on the U.S. public‘s views on the Middle East in early October. The public is increasingly pessimistic about regional developments following the Arab uprisings. In April 2011, 42 percent of Americans thought changes in leadership would “lead to lasting improvements for people” in countries like Egypt and Libya. But in October 2012, only 25 percent still believe there will be lasting improvements.The results were released prior to the final presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Overall the poll found little difference in opinion between Republicans, Democrats and Independents. The majority of Americans, 54 percent, say it is “more important to have stable governments in the Middle East, even if there is less democracy in the region.”

What Should the Next American President Do About China?

Oct 10, 2012
BBC Radio’s Robin Lustig moderated a debate with Elizabeth Economy, Chas W. Freeman, Jr., J. Stapleton Roy, and Yan Xuetong. This debate, the third in a three-part series sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment, was structured around three broad questions on how the next U.S. president ought to engage China.

Part II: Religious Leaders on Anti-Islam Film

Sep 28, 2012
On Sept. 9, the Salafi preacher and television host Sheikh Khalid Abdullah aired a YouTube clip of the "Innocence of Muslims" film on satellite channel al Nas. Religious leaders across the region condemned the film's offensive content. High-ranking clerics in Saudi Arabia, Egypt and elsewhere called for restraint after the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya on Sept. 11.

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