The Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Current Releases

Origins of the Suez Crisis: Postwar Development Diplomacy and the Struggle over Third World Industrialization, 1945–1956, by Guy Laron

Origins of the Suez Crisis: Postwar Development Diplomacy and the Struggle over Third World Industrialization, 1945–1956

Author(s)
Guy Laron

Origins of the Suez Crisis describes the long run-up to the 1956 Suez Crisis and the crisis itself by focusing on politics, economics, and foreign policy decisions in Egypt, Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union.

Sustaining Human Rights in the Twenty-First Century: Strategies from Latin America, edited by Katherine Hite and Mark Ungar

Sustaining Human Rights in the Twenty-First Century: Strategies from Latin America

In Sustaining Human Rights in the Twenty-first Century, some of the Western Hemisphere’s leading human rights experts shape and bolster new approaches, from the concepts of rights to transnational efforts, by placing the struggle for rights in historical and comparative perspective.

Battleground Africa: Cold War in the Congo, 1960–1965 by Lise Namikas

Battleground Africa: Cold War in the Congo, 1960–1965

Author(s)
Lise Namikas

Battleground Africa traces the Congo Crisis from post-World War II decolonization efforts through Mobutu's second coup in 1965 from a radically new vantage point.

Religion and Politics in Europe and the United States: Transnational Historical Approaches edited by Volker Depkat and Jurgen Martschukat

Religion and Politics in Europe and the United States: Transnational Historical Approaches

Religion and Politics in Europe and the United States compares the dynamic relationships between religion and public life in the United States and Europe from the early modern era to today by examining a series of public issues for which religious arguments have often been crucial.

What Should Think Tanks Do? A Strategic Guide to Policy Impact by Andrew Selee

What Should Think Tanks Do? A Strategic Guide to Policy Impact

Author(s)
Andrew Selee

What Should Think Tanks Do? is the first guide specifically tailored to think tanks, policy research, and advocacy organizations. Andrew Selee draws on interviews with members of leading think tanks, as well as cutting-edge thinking in business and nonprofit management, to provide strategies for setting policy-oriented goals and shaping public opinion. 

Latin American Populism in the Twenty-First Century, edited by Carlos de la Torre and Cynthia J. Arnson

Latin American Populism in the Twenty-First Century

Latin American Populism in the Twenty-first Century explains the emergence of today’s radical populism and places it in historical context, identifying continuities as well as differences from both the classical populism of the 1930s and 1940s and the neo-populism of the 1990s.

 Communism on Tomorrow Street: Mass Housing and Everyday Life after Stalin by Steven E. Harris

Communism on Tomorrow Street: Mass Housing and Everyday Life after Stalin

Author(s)
Steven E. Harris

Communism on Tomorrow Street examines how, beginning under Khrushchev in 1953, a generation of Soviet citizens moved from overcrowded communal dwellings to modern single-family apartments, later dubbed khrushchevka. Arguing that moving to a separate apartment allowed ordinary urban dwellers to experience Khrushchev’s thaw, Steven E. Harris fundamentally shifts interpretation of the period.

The Great Game, 1856–1907: Russo-British Relations in Central and East Asia by Evgeny Sergeev

The Great Game, 1856–1907: Russo-British Relations in Central and East Asia

Author(s)
Evgeny Sergeev

The Great Game, 1856–1907 presents a new view of the British-Russian competition for dominance in Central Asia in the second half of the nineteenth century. Evgeny Sergeev offers a complex and novel point of view by synthesizing official collections of documents, parliamentary papers, political pamphlets, memoirs, contemporary journalism, and guidebooks from unpublished and less studied primary sources in Russian, British, Indian, Georgian, Uzbek, and Turkmen archives.

State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine, edited by Catherine Wanner

State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine

State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine is a collection of essays written by a broad cross-section of scholars from around the world that explores the myriad forms religious expression and religious practice took in Soviet society in conjunction with the Soviet government's commitment to secularization.

Divided Together: The United States and the Soviet Union in the United Nations, 1945-1965, by Ilya V. Gaiduk

Divided Together: The United States and the Soviet Union in the United Nations, 1945-1965

Author(s)
Ilya V. Gaiduk

Divided Together studies US and Soviet policy toward the United Nations during the first two decades of the Cold War. It sheds new light on a series of key episodes, beginning with the prehistory of the UN, an institution that aimed to keep the Cold War cold. 

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About Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.