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The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union, by Yaacov Ro'i

The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union

Yaacov Ro’i and his collaborators provide the first scholarly survey of one of the most successful Soviet dissident movements, one which ultimately affected and reflected the demise of a superpower’s stature.

 

 

Russia, the Near Abroad, and the West: Lessons from the Moldova-Transdniestria Conflict by William H. Hill

Russia, the Near Abroad, and the West: Lessons from the Moldova-Transdniestria Conflict

Author(s)
William Hill

Post-communist Russia turned against the West in the 2000s, losing its earlier eagerness to collaborate with western Europe on economic and security matters and adopting a suspicious and defensive posture. This book, investigating a diplomatic negotiation involving Russia and the formerly Soviet Moldova, explains this dramatic shift in Russian foreign policy.

National Identities and Bilateral Relations: Widening Gaps in East Asia and Chinese Demonization of the United States, edited by Gilbert Rozman

National Identities and Bilateral Relations: Widening Gaps in East Asia and Chinese Demonization of the United States

The second of Gilbert Rozman's contributed volumes on East Asian national identity traces how efforts to draw a sharp divide between one country's identity and that of another shape relations in the post-Cold War era. It examines the two-way relations of Japan, South Korea, and China, introducing the concept of a national identity gap to estimate the degree to which the identities of two countries target each other as negative contrasts. This concept is then applied to China's reinterpretation from 2009 to 2011 of the gap between its identity and that of the United States. 

The Soviet Cuban Missile Crisis: Castro, Mikoyan, Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Missiles of November by Sergo Mikoyan

The Soviet Cuban Missile Crisis: Castro, Mikoyan, Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Missiles of November

Author(s)
Sergo A. Mikoyan

This book rewrites the conventional history of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis by drawing on secret transcripts of top-level diplomacy undertaken by Anastas Mikoyan, the number-two Soviet leader under Nikita Khrushchev. 

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America, edited by Cynthia J. Arnson

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America

In the Wake of War assesses the consequences of civil war for democratization in Latin America, focusing on questions of state capacity. Contributors focus on seven countries—Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru—where state weakness fostered conflict and the task of state reconstruction presents multiple challenges.

 

Outlier States: American Strategies to Change, Contain, or Engage Regimes by Robert S. Litwak

Outlier States: American Strategies to Change, Contain, or Engage Regimes

Author(s)
Robert S. Litwak

In the Bush era, Iran and North Korea were branded “rogue” states, and changing their regimes was the administration’s goal. The Obama administration has chosen instead to call the countries nuclear “outliers” and has proposed means other than regime change to bring them back into the fold, Outlier States, the successor to Litwak’s Regime Change: U.S. Strategy through the Prism of 9/11 (2007), explores this significant policy adjustment and raises questions about its feasibility and its possible consequences.

East Asian National Identities: Common Roots and Chinese Exceptionalism, edited by Gilbert Rozman

East Asian National Identities: Common Roots and Chinese Exceptionalism

This rigorous comparative study of national identity in Japan, South Korea, and China examines countries with long histories influenced by Confucian thought, surging nationalism, and far-reaching ambitions for regional importance. East Asian National Identities compares national identities in terms of six dimensions encompassing ideology; history; the salience of cultural, political, and economic factors; superiority as a model national community; displacement of the U.S. in Asia; and depth of national identity.

The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are, edited by Robin Wright

The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are

The Islamists Are Coming is the first book to survey the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab Spring. Often lumped together, the more than 50 Islamist parties with millions of followers now constitute a whole new spectrum—separate from either militants or secular parties. They will shape the new order in the world’s most volatile region more than any other political bloc. Yet they have diverse goals and different constituencies. Sometimes they are even rivals.

The New Geopolitics of Transatlantic Relations: Coordinated Responses to Common Dangers by Stefan Fröhlich

The New Geopolitics of Transatlantic Relations: Coordinated Responses to Common Dangers

Author(s)
Stefan Fröhlich

The United States and Europe encounter many of the same foreign policy challenges, which diversely impact the two regions and produce different but often complementary responses. This book develops a framework for future U.S.-Europe relations to work toward meaningful and logical solutions to their shared foreign policy problems.

China and Coexistence: Beijing's National Security Strategy for the Twenty-First Century by Liselotte Odgaard

China and Coexistence: Beijing's National Security Strategy for the Twenty-First Century

Author(s)
Liselotte Odgaard

"Peaceful coexistence," long a key phrase in China's strategic thinking, is a constructive doctrine that offers China a path for influencing the international system. So argues Liselotte Odgaard in this timely analysis of China's national security strategy in the context of its foreign policy practice.

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Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.