The Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Current Releases

Undeclared War and the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy by Kenneth B. Moss

Undeclared War and the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

Author(s)
Kenneth B. Moss

Undeclared wars have a history in the United States almost as old as the country itself. Kenneth B. Moss demonstrates that though the framers of the Constitution had a broad notion of the varieties of war and the authority under which they would be undertaken without a formal declaration, Congress and the President are leading the United States into conflicts without fundamental oversight and accountability.

China's Communist Party: Atrophy and Adaptation by David Shambaugh

China's Communist Party: Atrophy and Adaptation

Author(s)
David Shambaugh

David Shambaugh argues that although China's Communist Party has been languishing in a protracted state of atrophy, it has also recently embarked on a process of fierce critical introspection, adaptation, and reinvention to insure its own survival and future dominance in China.

Immigration and Integration in Urban Communities: Renegotiating the City, edited by Lisa M. Hanley, Blair A. Ruble, and Allison M. Garland

Immigration and Integration in Urban Communities: Renegotiating the City

In nations across the globe, immigration policies have abandoned strategies of multiculturalism in favor of a “play the game by our rules or leave” mentality. Immigration and Integration in Urban Communities shows how immigrants negotiate with longtime residents over economic, political, cultural, and linguistic boundaries.

Dispersed Relations: Americans and Canadians in Upper North America by Reginald C. Stuart

Dispersed Relations: Americans and Canadians in Upper North America

Author(s)
Reginald C. Stuart

Although their relationship sometimes seems wildly imbalanced, the United States and Canada are connected by regional, cultural, social, economic, and political communities. Dispersed Relations shows North America's shared cultural, social, economic, and political history.

Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China, edited by Ching Kwan Lee and Guobin Yang

Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China

Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution is the first comprehensive study of contemporary memories of China’s revolutionary epoch, from the time of Japanese imperialism through the Cultural Revolution.

The Art of Conversation: dialogue at the Woodrow Wilson Center by George Liston Seay and Peter J. Bean

The Art of Conversation: dialogue at the Woodrow Wilson Center

Author(s)
George Liston Seay, Peter J. Bean

A collection of conversations from dialogue, a weekly radio and television series of extensive interviews.

Local Consequences of the Global Cold War, edited by Jeffrey A. Engel

Local Consequences of the Global Cold War

Up to now the study of cold war history has been fully engaged in stressing the international character and broad themes of the story. This volume turns such diplomatic history upside down by studying how actions of international relations affected local popular life.

Soft Power and Its Perils: U.S. Cultural Policy in Early Postwar Japan and Permanent Dependency by Takeshi Matsuda

Soft Power and Its Perils: U.S. Cultural Policy in Early Postwar Japan and Permanent Dependency

Author(s)
Takeshi Matsuda

This book examines the cultural aspects of U.S.-Japan relations during the postwar Occupation and the early years of the Cold War and analyzes their effect on the adoption of democratic values by the Japanese.

The Arts of Democracy: Art, Public Culture, and the State, edited by Casey Nelson Blake

The Arts of Democracy: Art, Public Culture, and the State

The essays in The Arts of Democracy represent the coming of age of one of the liveliest fields in contemporary academic life. Written by some of the most respected and accomplished scholars working in their fields, this volume illuminates the often contradictory impulses that have shaped the historical intersection of the arts, public culture, and the state in modern America.

Regime Change: U.S. Strategy through the Prism of 9/11 by Robert S. Litwak

Regime Change: U.S. Strategy through the Prism of 9/11

Author(s)
Robert S. Litwak

Regime Change examines the contrasting precedents set with Iraq and Libya and analyzes the pressing crises with North Korea and Iran. This compelling book clarifies and critiques the terms in which today’s vital foreign policy and security debate is being conducted.

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About Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.