Asia Program

Events

Asia Program Mourns the Passing of a Giant

It is with great sadness that the Wilson Center’s Asia Program observes the passing of Dr. Robert A. Scalapino, the noted American scholar of Asian politics.

Pakistan-India Trade: What Needs to Be Done? What Does It Matter?

After a period of warming ties in 2011 and 2012, Pakistan-India relations are off to a rough start in 2013--threatening to weaken the momentum for normalizing commercial ties between the two neighbors. A new Asia Program publication on Pakistan-India trade highlights the benefits and risks--for both countries--of a formal trade relationship, and examines what needs to be done to push the process forward.

Salvaging a Troubled Marriage: Lessons for U.S.-Pakistan Relations

The new U.S. administration has inherited the challenge of a U.S.-Pakistan relationship in crisis. This policy brief argues that although strategic partnership may be impractical, sustained ties remain essential.

New Op-Ed on Reforming Pakistan Education by Wilson Center Pakistan Scholar Sabiha Mansoor

In the first of a two-part op-ed series in Pakistan's Daily Times newspaper, Sabiha Mansoor called for the adoption of a more innovative approach to improving higher education in Pakistan. Click here to read the op-ed.

Don’t Forget About Governance: The Risk of Tunnel Vision in Chasing Resilience for Asia’s Cities

Asia is going through an unprecedented wave of urbanization. Secondary and tertiary cities are seeing the most rapid changes in land-use and ownership, social structures, and values as peri-urban and agricultural land become part of metropolitan cityscapes. All the while, climate change is making many of these fast-growing cities more vulnerable to disasters.

U.S.-Australia Relations in Asia

This paper was presented at "Partnership in the Pacific: U.S.-Australia Cooperation and Asia," June 1, 2005, sponsored by the Asia Program.

Civilian Assistance to Pakistan: Cure or Curse?

Has civilian assistance to Pakistan over the past three decades assisted with development and improvements in living standards? Or has well-intended aid had a negative impact on Pakistan? The publication of the Wilson Center report Aiding Without Abetting: Making U.S. Civilian Assistance to Pakistan Work for Both Sides provided the London School of Economics with an opportunity to discuss these and related issues. This February 2, 2012, public event in London was co-hosted by the British Pakistan Foundation and LSE’s Asia Research Center.

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